An approach to characterising the cohesive behaviour of powders using a flow titration aerosolisation based methodology

Srinivas Behara, Ian Larson, Paul Kippax, David Morton, Peter Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterise the cohesive behaviour of powders by measuring aerosolisation at a sequence of different flow rates, i.e. flow titration. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 were model cohesive materials. Laser diffraction particle sizing of the aerosolised plume provided in-situ, real time particle size distributions of the aerosolised powder dispersed at increasing flow rates, from 30 to 180 L mina??1. Relative de-agglomeration was determined from the cumulative particle size of the aerosolised powder less than 5.4 I?m compared with the full availability of particles in that size range. Relative de-agglomeration-flow rate profiles were modelled using a non-linear least squares regression to fit an empirical 3-parameter sigmoidal equation; the parameters of the sigmoid were estimated from the data. Relative de-agglomerationa??flow rate titration profiles and their estimated parameters were obtained to define the different de-agglomeration mechanisms of the two cohesive powders. Salbutamol sulphate showed a maximum percent de-agglomeration of 54.9 , compared with Lactohale 300 which was only 29.5 . Lactohale 300 gave 50 of its maximum de-agglomeration at a flow rate of 48.0 L mina??1 while the equivalent for Salbutamol sulphate was 113.8 L mina??1. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 demonstrated different patterns of dispersion in relation to de-agglomeration mechanism. This approach to characterising the aerosolisation processes has significant application in designing formulation and processing strategies for pharmaceutical inhalation drug delivery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1640 - 1648
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Engineering Science
Volume66
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this study was to characterise the cohesive behaviour of powders by measuring aerosolisation at a sequence of different flow rates, i.e. flow titration. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 were model cohesive materials. Laser diffraction particle sizing of the aerosolised plume provided in-situ, real time particle size distributions of the aerosolised powder dispersed at increasing flow rates, from 30 to 180 L mina??1. Relative de-agglomeration was determined from the cumulative particle size of the aerosolised powder less than 5.4 I?m compared with the full availability of particles in that size range. Relative de-agglomeration-flow rate profiles were modelled using a non-linear least squares regression to fit an empirical 3-parameter sigmoidal equation; the parameters of the sigmoid were estimated from the data. Relative de-agglomerationa??flow rate titration profiles and their estimated parameters were obtained to define the different de-agglomeration mechanisms of the two cohesive powders. Salbutamol sulphate showed a maximum percent de-agglomeration of 54.9 , compared with Lactohale 300 which was only 29.5 . Lactohale 300 gave 50 of its maximum de-agglomeration at a flow rate of 48.0 L mina??1 while the equivalent for Salbutamol sulphate was 113.8 L mina??1. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 demonstrated different patterns of dispersion in relation to de-agglomeration mechanism. This approach to characterising the aerosolisation processes has significant application in designing formulation and processing strategies for pharmaceutical inhalation drug delivery.",
author = "Srinivas Behara and Ian Larson and Paul Kippax and David Morton and Peter Stewart",
year = "2011",
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An approach to characterising the cohesive behaviour of powders using a flow titration aerosolisation based methodology. / Behara, Srinivas; Larson, Ian; Kippax, Paul; Morton, David; Stewart, Peter.

In: Chemical Engineering Science, Vol. 66, No. 8, 2011, p. 1640 - 1648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An approach to characterising the cohesive behaviour of powders using a flow titration aerosolisation based methodology

AU - Behara, Srinivas

AU - Larson, Ian

AU - Kippax, Paul

AU - Morton, David

AU - Stewart, Peter

PY - 2011

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N2 - The purpose of this study was to characterise the cohesive behaviour of powders by measuring aerosolisation at a sequence of different flow rates, i.e. flow titration. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 were model cohesive materials. Laser diffraction particle sizing of the aerosolised plume provided in-situ, real time particle size distributions of the aerosolised powder dispersed at increasing flow rates, from 30 to 180 L mina??1. Relative de-agglomeration was determined from the cumulative particle size of the aerosolised powder less than 5.4 I?m compared with the full availability of particles in that size range. Relative de-agglomeration-flow rate profiles were modelled using a non-linear least squares regression to fit an empirical 3-parameter sigmoidal equation; the parameters of the sigmoid were estimated from the data. Relative de-agglomerationa??flow rate titration profiles and their estimated parameters were obtained to define the different de-agglomeration mechanisms of the two cohesive powders. Salbutamol sulphate showed a maximum percent de-agglomeration of 54.9 , compared with Lactohale 300 which was only 29.5 . Lactohale 300 gave 50 of its maximum de-agglomeration at a flow rate of 48.0 L mina??1 while the equivalent for Salbutamol sulphate was 113.8 L mina??1. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 demonstrated different patterns of dispersion in relation to de-agglomeration mechanism. This approach to characterising the aerosolisation processes has significant application in designing formulation and processing strategies for pharmaceutical inhalation drug delivery.

AB - The purpose of this study was to characterise the cohesive behaviour of powders by measuring aerosolisation at a sequence of different flow rates, i.e. flow titration. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 were model cohesive materials. Laser diffraction particle sizing of the aerosolised plume provided in-situ, real time particle size distributions of the aerosolised powder dispersed at increasing flow rates, from 30 to 180 L mina??1. Relative de-agglomeration was determined from the cumulative particle size of the aerosolised powder less than 5.4 I?m compared with the full availability of particles in that size range. Relative de-agglomeration-flow rate profiles were modelled using a non-linear least squares regression to fit an empirical 3-parameter sigmoidal equation; the parameters of the sigmoid were estimated from the data. Relative de-agglomerationa??flow rate titration profiles and their estimated parameters were obtained to define the different de-agglomeration mechanisms of the two cohesive powders. Salbutamol sulphate showed a maximum percent de-agglomeration of 54.9 , compared with Lactohale 300 which was only 29.5 . Lactohale 300 gave 50 of its maximum de-agglomeration at a flow rate of 48.0 L mina??1 while the equivalent for Salbutamol sulphate was 113.8 L mina??1. Salbutamol sulphate and Lactohale 300 demonstrated different patterns of dispersion in relation to de-agglomeration mechanism. This approach to characterising the aerosolisation processes has significant application in designing formulation and processing strategies for pharmaceutical inhalation drug delivery.

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JO - Chemical Engineering Science

JF - Chemical Engineering Science

SN - 0009-2509

IS - 8

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