Affective events theory as a framework for understanding third-party consumer complaints

Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Charmine E.J. Härtel, Amanda Beatson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poor complaint management may result in organizations losing customers and revenue. Consumers exhibit negative emotional responses when dissatisfied and this may lead to a complaint to a third-party organization. Since little information is available on the role of emotion in the consumer complaint process or how to manage complaints effectively, we offer an emotions perspective by applying Affective Events Theory (AET) to complaint behavior. This study presents the first application of AET in a consumption context and advances a theoretical framework supported by qualitative research for emotional responses to complaints. In contrast to commonly held views on gender and emotion, men as well as women use emotion-focused coping to complain.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWhat Have We Learned? Ten Years On
EditorsCharmine Hartel, Neal Ashkanasy, Wilfred Zerbe
Chapter7
Pages167-193
Number of pages27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameResearch on Emotion in Organizations
Volume7
ISSN (Print)1746-9791

Cite this

Russell-Bennett, R., Härtel, C. E. J., & Beatson, A. (2011). Affective events theory as a framework for understanding third-party consumer complaints. In C. Hartel, N. Ashkanasy, & W. Zerbe (Eds.), What Have We Learned? Ten Years On (pp. 167-193). (Research on Emotion in Organizations; Vol. 7). https://doi.org/10.1108/S1746-9791(2011)0000007012