Advanced 3D printed model of middle cerebral artery aneurysms for neurosurgery simulation

Ruth G. Nagassa, Paul G. McMenamin, Justin W. Adams, Michelle R. Quayle, Jeffrey V. Rosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Neurosurgical residents are finding it more difficult to obtain experience as the primary operator in aneurysm surgery. The present study aimed to replicate patient-derived cranial anatomy, pathology and human tissue properties relevant to cerebral aneurysm intervention through 3D printing and 3D print-driven casting techniques. The final simulator was designed to provide accurate simulation of a human head with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm.
Methods
This study utilized living human and cadaver-derived medical imaging data including CT angiography and MRI scans. Computer-aided design (CAD) models and pre-existing computational 3D models were also incorporated in the development of the simulator. The design was based on including anatomical components vital to the surgery of MCA aneurysms while focusing on reproducibility, adaptability and functionality of the simulator. Various methods of 3D printing were utilized for the direct development of anatomical replicas and moulds for casting components that optimized the bio-mimicry and mechanical properties of human tissues. Synthetic materials including various types of silicone and ballistics gelatin were cast in these moulds. A novel technique utilizing water-soluble wax and silicone was used to establish hollow patient-derived cerebrovascular models.
Results
A patient-derived 3D aneurysm model was constructed for a MCA aneurysm. Multiple cerebral aneurysm models, patient-derived and CAD, were replicated as hollow high-fidelity models. The final assembled simulator integrated six anatomical components relevant to the treatment of cerebral aneurysms of the Circle of Willis in the left cerebral hemisphere. These included models of the cerebral vasculature, cranial nerves, brain, meninges, skull and skin. The cerebral circulation was modeled through the patient-derived vasculature within the brain model. Linear and volumetric measurements of specific physical modular components were repeated, averaged and compared to the original 3D meshes generated from the medical imaging data. Calculation of the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc: 90.2%–99.0%) and percentage difference (≤0.4%) confirmed the accuracy of the models.
Conclusions
A multi-disciplinary approach involving 3D printing and casting techniques was used to successfully construct a multi-component cerebral aneurysm surgery simulator. Further study is planned to demonstrate the educational value of the proposed simulator for neurosurgery residents.
Original languageEnglish
Article number11
Number of pages12
Journal3D Printing in Medicine
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • neurosurgical training
  • anatomical models
  • aneurysm
  • 3D printing
  • simulation

Cite this

@article{5ec65a4b6ce541119adc19f0f11c4133,
title = "Advanced 3D printed model of middle cerebral artery aneurysms for neurosurgery simulation",
abstract = "BackgroundNeurosurgical residents are finding it more difficult to obtain experience as the primary operator in aneurysm surgery. The present study aimed to replicate patient-derived cranial anatomy, pathology and human tissue properties relevant to cerebral aneurysm intervention through 3D printing and 3D print-driven casting techniques. The final simulator was designed to provide accurate simulation of a human head with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm.MethodsThis study utilized living human and cadaver-derived medical imaging data including CT angiography and MRI scans. Computer-aided design (CAD) models and pre-existing computational 3D models were also incorporated in the development of the simulator. The design was based on including anatomical components vital to the surgery of MCA aneurysms while focusing on reproducibility, adaptability and functionality of the simulator. Various methods of 3D printing were utilized for the direct development of anatomical replicas and moulds for casting components that optimized the bio-mimicry and mechanical properties of human tissues. Synthetic materials including various types of silicone and ballistics gelatin were cast in these moulds. A novel technique utilizing water-soluble wax and silicone was used to establish hollow patient-derived cerebrovascular models.ResultsA patient-derived 3D aneurysm model was constructed for a MCA aneurysm. Multiple cerebral aneurysm models, patient-derived and CAD, were replicated as hollow high-fidelity models. The final assembled simulator integrated six anatomical components relevant to the treatment of cerebral aneurysms of the Circle of Willis in the left cerebral hemisphere. These included models of the cerebral vasculature, cranial nerves, brain, meninges, skull and skin. The cerebral circulation was modeled through the patient-derived vasculature within the brain model. Linear and volumetric measurements of specific physical modular components were repeated, averaged and compared to the original 3D meshes generated from the medical imaging data. Calculation of the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc: 90.2{\%}–99.0{\%}) and percentage difference (≤0.4{\%}) confirmed the accuracy of the models.ConclusionsA multi-disciplinary approach involving 3D printing and casting techniques was used to successfully construct a multi-component cerebral aneurysm surgery simulator. Further study is planned to demonstrate the educational value of the proposed simulator for neurosurgery residents.",
keywords = "neurosurgical training, anatomical models, aneurysm, 3D printing, simulation",
author = "Nagassa, {Ruth G.} and McMenamin, {Paul G.} and Adams, {Justin W.} and Quayle, {Michelle R.} and Rosenfeld, {Jeffrey V.}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1186/s41205-019-0048-9",
language = "English",
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Advanced 3D printed model of middle cerebral artery aneurysms for neurosurgery simulation. / Nagassa, Ruth G.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Adams, Justin W.; Quayle, Michelle R.; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.

In: 3D Printing in Medicine, Vol. 5, 11, 01.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Advanced 3D printed model of middle cerebral artery aneurysms for neurosurgery simulation

AU - Nagassa, Ruth G.

AU - McMenamin, Paul G.

AU - Adams, Justin W.

AU - Quayle, Michelle R.

AU - Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.

PY - 2019/8/1

Y1 - 2019/8/1

N2 - BackgroundNeurosurgical residents are finding it more difficult to obtain experience as the primary operator in aneurysm surgery. The present study aimed to replicate patient-derived cranial anatomy, pathology and human tissue properties relevant to cerebral aneurysm intervention through 3D printing and 3D print-driven casting techniques. The final simulator was designed to provide accurate simulation of a human head with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm.MethodsThis study utilized living human and cadaver-derived medical imaging data including CT angiography and MRI scans. Computer-aided design (CAD) models and pre-existing computational 3D models were also incorporated in the development of the simulator. The design was based on including anatomical components vital to the surgery of MCA aneurysms while focusing on reproducibility, adaptability and functionality of the simulator. Various methods of 3D printing were utilized for the direct development of anatomical replicas and moulds for casting components that optimized the bio-mimicry and mechanical properties of human tissues. Synthetic materials including various types of silicone and ballistics gelatin were cast in these moulds. A novel technique utilizing water-soluble wax and silicone was used to establish hollow patient-derived cerebrovascular models.ResultsA patient-derived 3D aneurysm model was constructed for a MCA aneurysm. Multiple cerebral aneurysm models, patient-derived and CAD, were replicated as hollow high-fidelity models. The final assembled simulator integrated six anatomical components relevant to the treatment of cerebral aneurysms of the Circle of Willis in the left cerebral hemisphere. These included models of the cerebral vasculature, cranial nerves, brain, meninges, skull and skin. The cerebral circulation was modeled through the patient-derived vasculature within the brain model. Linear and volumetric measurements of specific physical modular components were repeated, averaged and compared to the original 3D meshes generated from the medical imaging data. Calculation of the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc: 90.2%–99.0%) and percentage difference (≤0.4%) confirmed the accuracy of the models.ConclusionsA multi-disciplinary approach involving 3D printing and casting techniques was used to successfully construct a multi-component cerebral aneurysm surgery simulator. Further study is planned to demonstrate the educational value of the proposed simulator for neurosurgery residents.

AB - BackgroundNeurosurgical residents are finding it more difficult to obtain experience as the primary operator in aneurysm surgery. The present study aimed to replicate patient-derived cranial anatomy, pathology and human tissue properties relevant to cerebral aneurysm intervention through 3D printing and 3D print-driven casting techniques. The final simulator was designed to provide accurate simulation of a human head with a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm.MethodsThis study utilized living human and cadaver-derived medical imaging data including CT angiography and MRI scans. Computer-aided design (CAD) models and pre-existing computational 3D models were also incorporated in the development of the simulator. The design was based on including anatomical components vital to the surgery of MCA aneurysms while focusing on reproducibility, adaptability and functionality of the simulator. Various methods of 3D printing were utilized for the direct development of anatomical replicas and moulds for casting components that optimized the bio-mimicry and mechanical properties of human tissues. Synthetic materials including various types of silicone and ballistics gelatin were cast in these moulds. A novel technique utilizing water-soluble wax and silicone was used to establish hollow patient-derived cerebrovascular models.ResultsA patient-derived 3D aneurysm model was constructed for a MCA aneurysm. Multiple cerebral aneurysm models, patient-derived and CAD, were replicated as hollow high-fidelity models. The final assembled simulator integrated six anatomical components relevant to the treatment of cerebral aneurysms of the Circle of Willis in the left cerebral hemisphere. These included models of the cerebral vasculature, cranial nerves, brain, meninges, skull and skin. The cerebral circulation was modeled through the patient-derived vasculature within the brain model. Linear and volumetric measurements of specific physical modular components were repeated, averaged and compared to the original 3D meshes generated from the medical imaging data. Calculation of the concordance correlation coefficient (ρc: 90.2%–99.0%) and percentage difference (≤0.4%) confirmed the accuracy of the models.ConclusionsA multi-disciplinary approach involving 3D printing and casting techniques was used to successfully construct a multi-component cerebral aneurysm surgery simulator. Further study is planned to demonstrate the educational value of the proposed simulator for neurosurgery residents.

KW - neurosurgical training

KW - anatomical models

KW - aneurysm

KW - 3D printing

KW - simulation

U2 - 10.1186/s41205-019-0048-9

DO - 10.1186/s41205-019-0048-9

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - 3D Printing in Medicine

JF - 3D Printing in Medicine

SN - 2365-6271

M1 - 11

ER -