Adult outcomes in autism: community inclusion and living skills

Kylie Megan Gray, Caroline Keating, John Raymond Taffe, Avril Vaux Brereton, Stewart Lloyd Einfeld, Tessa C Reardon, Bruce John Tonge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Longitudinal research has demonstrated that social outcomes for adults with autism are restricted, particularly in terms of employment and living arrangements. However, understanding of individual and environmental factors that influence these outcomes is far from complete. This longitudinal study followed a community sample of children and adolescents with autism into adulthood. Social outcomes in relation to community inclusion and living skills were examined, including the predictive role of a range of individual factors and the environment (socio-economic disadvantage). Overall, the degree of community inclusion and living skills was restricted for the majority, and while childhood IQ was an important determinant of these outcomes, it was not the sole predictor. The implications of these findings in relation to interventions are discussed. ? 2014 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3006 - 3015
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Gray, Kylie Megan ; Keating, Caroline ; Taffe, John Raymond ; Brereton, Avril Vaux ; Einfeld, Stewart Lloyd ; Reardon, Tessa C ; Tonge, Bruce John. / Adult outcomes in autism: community inclusion and living skills. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2014 ; Vol. 44, No. 12. pp. 3006 - 3015.
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Adult outcomes in autism: community inclusion and living skills. / Gray, Kylie Megan; Keating, Caroline; Taffe, John Raymond; Brereton, Avril Vaux; Einfeld, Stewart Lloyd; Reardon, Tessa C; Tonge, Bruce John.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 44, No. 12, 2014, p. 3006 - 3015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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