Adjusting to life in a residential aged care facility

Perspectives of people with dementia, family members and facility care staff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To determine factors that facilitate or impede adjustment to residential aged care (RAC) from the perspectives of residents with dementia, families of residents with dementia and facility staff. Background: The transition to a RAC facility can be highly stressful for people with dementia and their families, but we lack an understanding of how people with dementia experience this transition. Knowledge on adjustment to the new environment is essential in order to develop procedures and interventions that better support residents. Design and methods: This study consisted of interviews with 12 residents with dementia who had resided at a RAC facility for six months or less; 14 family members of RAC residents with dementia; and 12 RAC facility staff members. Parallel interview schedules were constructed, with questions on the experience of relocating to RAC for a person with dementia and views on enablers and barriers to successful adjustment. Thematic analysis guided the analysis of data. The study adhered to the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) guidelines (see Supplementary File S1). Results: Adjustment to RAC appeared variable, with several residents reporting poor acceptance of their circumstances several months after the relocation. The three groups were largely congruent regarding the importance of support from families and staff, and the development of new relationships with other residents, but not all residents had succeeded in forming friendships. The provision of meaningful activities and opportunities to exert autonomy day-to-day were seen as critical, but staff experienced challenges in providing individualised care due to lack of dedicated time to engage with residents. Conclusion and relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for evaluated interventions to help people with dementia to successfully transition to RAC. Attention should be paid to the way in which care is coordinated within the RAC sector, to enable staff to provide individualised approaches to facilitate adjustment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3901-3913
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume28
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 21 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • adjustment
  • dementia care
  • family carers/caregivers
  • long-term care
  • nursing homes
  • residential aged care
  • skilled nursing facility

Cite this

@article{c6b61bc88787458ba2469ab1d76e5821,
title = "Adjusting to life in a residential aged care facility: Perspectives of people with dementia, family members and facility care staff",
abstract = "Aims and objectives: To determine factors that facilitate or impede adjustment to residential aged care (RAC) from the perspectives of residents with dementia, families of residents with dementia and facility staff. Background: The transition to a RAC facility can be highly stressful for people with dementia and their families, but we lack an understanding of how people with dementia experience this transition. Knowledge on adjustment to the new environment is essential in order to develop procedures and interventions that better support residents. Design and methods: This study consisted of interviews with 12 residents with dementia who had resided at a RAC facility for six months or less; 14 family members of RAC residents with dementia; and 12 RAC facility staff members. Parallel interview schedules were constructed, with questions on the experience of relocating to RAC for a person with dementia and views on enablers and barriers to successful adjustment. Thematic analysis guided the analysis of data. The study adhered to the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) guidelines (see Supplementary File S1). Results: Adjustment to RAC appeared variable, with several residents reporting poor acceptance of their circumstances several months after the relocation. The three groups were largely congruent regarding the importance of support from families and staff, and the development of new relationships with other residents, but not all residents had succeeded in forming friendships. The provision of meaningful activities and opportunities to exert autonomy day-to-day were seen as critical, but staff experienced challenges in providing individualised care due to lack of dedicated time to engage with residents. Conclusion and relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for evaluated interventions to help people with dementia to successfully transition to RAC. Attention should be paid to the way in which care is coordinated within the RAC sector, to enable staff to provide individualised approaches to facilitate adjustment.",
keywords = "adjustment, dementia care, family carers/caregivers, long-term care, nursing homes, residential aged care, skilled nursing facility",
author = "Davison, {Tanya E.} and Vera Cam{\~o}es-Costa and Anna Clark",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.14978",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "3901--3913",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "21",

}

Adjusting to life in a residential aged care facility : Perspectives of people with dementia, family members and facility care staff. / Davison, Tanya E.; Camões-Costa, Vera; Clark, Anna.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 28, No. 21, 21.07.2019, p. 3901-3913.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adjusting to life in a residential aged care facility

T2 - Perspectives of people with dementia, family members and facility care staff

AU - Davison, Tanya E.

AU - Camões-Costa, Vera

AU - Clark, Anna

PY - 2019/7/21

Y1 - 2019/7/21

N2 - Aims and objectives: To determine factors that facilitate or impede adjustment to residential aged care (RAC) from the perspectives of residents with dementia, families of residents with dementia and facility staff. Background: The transition to a RAC facility can be highly stressful for people with dementia and their families, but we lack an understanding of how people with dementia experience this transition. Knowledge on adjustment to the new environment is essential in order to develop procedures and interventions that better support residents. Design and methods: This study consisted of interviews with 12 residents with dementia who had resided at a RAC facility for six months or less; 14 family members of RAC residents with dementia; and 12 RAC facility staff members. Parallel interview schedules were constructed, with questions on the experience of relocating to RAC for a person with dementia and views on enablers and barriers to successful adjustment. Thematic analysis guided the analysis of data. The study adhered to the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) guidelines (see Supplementary File S1). Results: Adjustment to RAC appeared variable, with several residents reporting poor acceptance of their circumstances several months after the relocation. The three groups were largely congruent regarding the importance of support from families and staff, and the development of new relationships with other residents, but not all residents had succeeded in forming friendships. The provision of meaningful activities and opportunities to exert autonomy day-to-day were seen as critical, but staff experienced challenges in providing individualised care due to lack of dedicated time to engage with residents. Conclusion and relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for evaluated interventions to help people with dementia to successfully transition to RAC. Attention should be paid to the way in which care is coordinated within the RAC sector, to enable staff to provide individualised approaches to facilitate adjustment.

AB - Aims and objectives: To determine factors that facilitate or impede adjustment to residential aged care (RAC) from the perspectives of residents with dementia, families of residents with dementia and facility staff. Background: The transition to a RAC facility can be highly stressful for people with dementia and their families, but we lack an understanding of how people with dementia experience this transition. Knowledge on adjustment to the new environment is essential in order to develop procedures and interventions that better support residents. Design and methods: This study consisted of interviews with 12 residents with dementia who had resided at a RAC facility for six months or less; 14 family members of RAC residents with dementia; and 12 RAC facility staff members. Parallel interview schedules were constructed, with questions on the experience of relocating to RAC for a person with dementia and views on enablers and barriers to successful adjustment. Thematic analysis guided the analysis of data. The study adhered to the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) guidelines (see Supplementary File S1). Results: Adjustment to RAC appeared variable, with several residents reporting poor acceptance of their circumstances several months after the relocation. The three groups were largely congruent regarding the importance of support from families and staff, and the development of new relationships with other residents, but not all residents had succeeded in forming friendships. The provision of meaningful activities and opportunities to exert autonomy day-to-day were seen as critical, but staff experienced challenges in providing individualised care due to lack of dedicated time to engage with residents. Conclusion and relevance to clinical practice: There is a need for evaluated interventions to help people with dementia to successfully transition to RAC. Attention should be paid to the way in which care is coordinated within the RAC sector, to enable staff to provide individualised approaches to facilitate adjustment.

KW - adjustment

KW - dementia care

KW - family carers/caregivers

KW - long-term care

KW - nursing homes

KW - residential aged care

KW - skilled nursing facility

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069751612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.14978

DO - 10.1111/jocn.14978

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 3901

EP - 3913

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 21

ER -