Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha

Sebastian Kruss, Luise Erpenbeck, Katharina Amschler, Tabea Anne Mundinger, Heike Boehm, Hans Joachim Helms, Tim Friede, Robert Keith Andrews, Michael Schon, Joachim Pius Spatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Neutrophilic granulocytes play a fundamental role in cardiovascular disease. They interact with platelet aggregates via the integrin Mac-1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein Iba (GPIba). In vivo, GPIba presentation is highly variable under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we quantitatively determined the conditions for neutrophil adhesion in a biomimetic in vitro system, which allowed precise adjustment of the spacings between human GPIba presented on the nanoscale from 60 to 200 nm. Unlike most conventional nanopatterning approaches, this method provided control over the local receptor density (spacing) rather than just the global receptor density. Under physiological flow conditions, neutrophils required a minimum spacing of GPIba molecules to successfully adhere. In contrast, under low-flow conditions, neutrophils adhered on all tested spacings with subtle but nonlinear differences in cell response, including spreading area, spreading kinetics, adhesion maturation, and mobility. Surprisingly, Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion was very robust to GPIba density variations up to 1 order of magnitude. This complex response map indicates that neutrophil adhesion under flow and adhesion maturation are differentially regulated by GPIba density. Our study reveals how Mac-1/GPIba interactions govern cell adhesion and how neutrophils process the number of available surface receptors on the nanoscale. In the future, such in vitro studies can be useful to determine optimum therapeutic ranges for targeting this interaction. ? 2013 American Chemical Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9984 - 9996
Number of pages13
JournalACS Nano
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Kruss, S., Erpenbeck, L., Amschler, K., Mundinger, T. A., Boehm, H., Helms, H. J., ... Spatz, J. P. (2013). Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha. ACS Nano, 7(11), 9984 - 9996. https://doi.org/10.1021/nn403923h
Kruss, Sebastian ; Erpenbeck, Luise ; Amschler, Katharina ; Mundinger, Tabea Anne ; Boehm, Heike ; Helms, Hans Joachim ; Friede, Tim ; Andrews, Robert Keith ; Schon, Michael ; Spatz, Joachim Pius. / Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha. In: ACS Nano. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 11. pp. 9984 - 9996.
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abstract = "Neutrophilic granulocytes play a fundamental role in cardiovascular disease. They interact with platelet aggregates via the integrin Mac-1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein Iba (GPIba). In vivo, GPIba presentation is highly variable under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we quantitatively determined the conditions for neutrophil adhesion in a biomimetic in vitro system, which allowed precise adjustment of the spacings between human GPIba presented on the nanoscale from 60 to 200 nm. Unlike most conventional nanopatterning approaches, this method provided control over the local receptor density (spacing) rather than just the global receptor density. Under physiological flow conditions, neutrophils required a minimum spacing of GPIba molecules to successfully adhere. In contrast, under low-flow conditions, neutrophils adhered on all tested spacings with subtle but nonlinear differences in cell response, including spreading area, spreading kinetics, adhesion maturation, and mobility. Surprisingly, Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion was very robust to GPIba density variations up to 1 order of magnitude. This complex response map indicates that neutrophil adhesion under flow and adhesion maturation are differentially regulated by GPIba density. Our study reveals how Mac-1/GPIba interactions govern cell adhesion and how neutrophils process the number of available surface receptors on the nanoscale. In the future, such in vitro studies can be useful to determine optimum therapeutic ranges for targeting this interaction. ? 2013 American Chemical Society.",
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Kruss, S, Erpenbeck, L, Amschler, K, Mundinger, TA, Boehm, H, Helms, HJ, Friede, T, Andrews, RK, Schon, M & Spatz, JP 2013, 'Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha' ACS Nano, vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 9984 - 9996. https://doi.org/10.1021/nn403923h

Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha. / Kruss, Sebastian; Erpenbeck, Luise; Amschler, Katharina; Mundinger, Tabea Anne; Boehm, Heike; Helms, Hans Joachim; Friede, Tim; Andrews, Robert Keith; Schon, Michael; Spatz, Joachim Pius.

In: ACS Nano, Vol. 7, No. 11, 2013, p. 9984 - 9996.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Kruss, Sebastian

AU - Erpenbeck, Luise

AU - Amschler, Katharina

AU - Mundinger, Tabea Anne

AU - Boehm, Heike

AU - Helms, Hans Joachim

AU - Friede, Tim

AU - Andrews, Robert Keith

AU - Schon, Michael

AU - Spatz, Joachim Pius

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N2 - Neutrophilic granulocytes play a fundamental role in cardiovascular disease. They interact with platelet aggregates via the integrin Mac-1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein Iba (GPIba). In vivo, GPIba presentation is highly variable under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we quantitatively determined the conditions for neutrophil adhesion in a biomimetic in vitro system, which allowed precise adjustment of the spacings between human GPIba presented on the nanoscale from 60 to 200 nm. Unlike most conventional nanopatterning approaches, this method provided control over the local receptor density (spacing) rather than just the global receptor density. Under physiological flow conditions, neutrophils required a minimum spacing of GPIba molecules to successfully adhere. In contrast, under low-flow conditions, neutrophils adhered on all tested spacings with subtle but nonlinear differences in cell response, including spreading area, spreading kinetics, adhesion maturation, and mobility. Surprisingly, Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion was very robust to GPIba density variations up to 1 order of magnitude. This complex response map indicates that neutrophil adhesion under flow and adhesion maturation are differentially regulated by GPIba density. Our study reveals how Mac-1/GPIba interactions govern cell adhesion and how neutrophils process the number of available surface receptors on the nanoscale. In the future, such in vitro studies can be useful to determine optimum therapeutic ranges for targeting this interaction. ? 2013 American Chemical Society.

AB - Neutrophilic granulocytes play a fundamental role in cardiovascular disease. They interact with platelet aggregates via the integrin Mac-1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein Iba (GPIba). In vivo, GPIba presentation is highly variable under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we quantitatively determined the conditions for neutrophil adhesion in a biomimetic in vitro system, which allowed precise adjustment of the spacings between human GPIba presented on the nanoscale from 60 to 200 nm. Unlike most conventional nanopatterning approaches, this method provided control over the local receptor density (spacing) rather than just the global receptor density. Under physiological flow conditions, neutrophils required a minimum spacing of GPIba molecules to successfully adhere. In contrast, under low-flow conditions, neutrophils adhered on all tested spacings with subtle but nonlinear differences in cell response, including spreading area, spreading kinetics, adhesion maturation, and mobility. Surprisingly, Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion was very robust to GPIba density variations up to 1 order of magnitude. This complex response map indicates that neutrophil adhesion under flow and adhesion maturation are differentially regulated by GPIba density. Our study reveals how Mac-1/GPIba interactions govern cell adhesion and how neutrophils process the number of available surface receptors on the nanoscale. In the future, such in vitro studies can be useful to determine optimum therapeutic ranges for targeting this interaction. ? 2013 American Chemical Society.

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U2 - 10.1021/nn403923h

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M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 9984

EP - 9996

JO - ACS Nano

JF - ACS Nano

SN - 1936-0851

IS - 11

ER -

Kruss S, Erpenbeck L, Amschler K, Mundinger TA, Boehm H, Helms HJ et al. Adhesion maturation of neutrophils on nanoscopically presented platelet glycoprotein ibalpha. ACS Nano. 2013;7(11):9984 - 9996. https://doi.org/10.1021/nn403923h