Adaptive platform trials

definition, design, conduct and reporting considerations

The Adaptive Platform Trials Coalition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers, clinicians, policymakers and patients are increasingly interested in questions about therapeutic interventions that are difficult or costly to answer with traditional, free-standing, parallel-group randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Examples include scenarios in which there is a desire to compare multiple interventions, to generate separate effect estimates across subgroups of patients with distinct but related conditions or clinical features, or to minimize downtime between trials. In response, researchers have proposed new RCT designs such as adaptive platform trials (APTs), which are able to study multiple interventions in a disease or condition in a perpetual manner, with interventions entering and leaving the platform on the basis of a predefined decision algorithm. APTs offer innovations that could reshape clinical trials, and several APTs are now funded in various disease areas. With the aim of facilitating the use of APTs, here we review common features and issues that arise with such trials, and offer recommendations to promote best practices in their design, conduct, oversight and reporting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)797-807
Number of pages11
JournalNature Reviews Drug Discovery
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

Cite this

The Adaptive Platform Trials Coalition. / Adaptive platform trials : definition, design, conduct and reporting considerations. In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. 2019 ; Vol. 18, No. 10. pp. 797-807.
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Adaptive platform trials : definition, design, conduct and reporting considerations. / The Adaptive Platform Trials Coalition.

In: Nature Reviews Drug Discovery, Vol. 18, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 797-807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Webb, Steven A.R.

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AU - Krams, Michael

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