Adapting, pilot testing and evaluating the Kick.it app to support smoking cessation for smokers with severe mental illness: A study protocol

Sharon Lawn, Joseph van Agteren, Sara Zabeen, Sue Bertossa, Christopher Barton, James Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

(1) Background: While the prevalence of tobacco smoking in the general population has declined, it remains exceptionally high for smokers with severe mental illness (SMI), despite significant public health measures. This project aims to adapt, pilot test and evaluate a novel e-health smoking cessation intervention to assist relapse prevention and encourage sustained smoking cessation for young adults (aged 18–29 years) with SMI. (2) Methods: Using co-design principles, the researchers will adapt the Kick.it smartphone App in collaboration with a small sample of current and ex-smokers with SMI. In-depth interviews with smokers with SMI who have attempted to quit in the past 12 months and ex-smokers (i.e., those having not smoked in the past seven days) will explore their perceptions of smoking cessation support options that have been of value to them. Focus group participants will then give their feedback on the existing Kick.it App and any adaptations needed. The adapted App will then be pilot-tested with a small sample of young adult smokers with SMI interested in attempting to cut down or quit smoking, measuring utility, feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes in supporting their quit efforts. (3) Conclusions: This pilot work will inform a larger definitive trial. Dependent on recruitment success, the project may extend to also include smokers with SMI who are aged 30 years or more.

LanguageEnglish
Article number254
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Co-design
  • Mental illness
  • Protocol
  • Qualitative research
  • Smoking cessation
  • Technology
  • Youth

Cite this

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title = "Adapting, pilot testing and evaluating the Kick.it app to support smoking cessation for smokers with severe mental illness: A study protocol",
abstract = "(1) Background: While the prevalence of tobacco smoking in the general population has declined, it remains exceptionally high for smokers with severe mental illness (SMI), despite significant public health measures. This project aims to adapt, pilot test and evaluate a novel e-health smoking cessation intervention to assist relapse prevention and encourage sustained smoking cessation for young adults (aged 18–29 years) with SMI. (2) Methods: Using co-design principles, the researchers will adapt the Kick.it smartphone App in collaboration with a small sample of current and ex-smokers with SMI. In-depth interviews with smokers with SMI who have attempted to quit in the past 12 months and ex-smokers (i.e., those having not smoked in the past seven days) will explore their perceptions of smoking cessation support options that have been of value to them. Focus group participants will then give their feedback on the existing Kick.it App and any adaptations needed. The adapted App will then be pilot-tested with a small sample of young adult smokers with SMI interested in attempting to cut down or quit smoking, measuring utility, feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes in supporting their quit efforts. (3) Conclusions: This pilot work will inform a larger definitive trial. Dependent on recruitment success, the project may extend to also include smokers with SMI who are aged 30 years or more.",
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Adapting, pilot testing and evaluating the Kick.it app to support smoking cessation for smokers with severe mental illness : A study protocol. / Lawn, Sharon; van Agteren, Joseph; Zabeen, Sara; Bertossa, Sue; Barton, Christopher; Stewart, James.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 15, No. 2, 254, 03.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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