Acupuncture versus Sham Acupuncture for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain

Shaun Wen Huey Lee, Men Long Liong, Kah Hay Yuen, Wing Seng Leong, Christopher Chee, Phaik Yeong Cheah, Weng Pho Choong, Yue Wu, Nurzalina Khan, Wooi Long Choong, Hin Wai Yap, John N. Krieger

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68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) afflicts 2%-10% of adult men. Available therapies offer little or no proven benefit. Because acupuncture represents an attractive "natural" therapy, we compared the efficacy of acupuncture to sham acupuncture for CP/CPPS. Methods: Participants met US National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for CP/CPPS, were aged ≥20 years old, and had a total score ≥15 on the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and symptoms for at least 3 of the preceding 6 months. They were randomized 1:1 to acupuncture or sham acupuncture. Treatment consisted of twice-weekly 30-minute sessions for 10 weeks (20 sessions total) without needle stimulation, herbs, or adjuvants. The primary response criterion was a 6-point decrease from baseline to week 10 in NIH-CPSI total score (range 0-43). Results: Thirty-two (73%) of 44 participants responded in the acupuncture group compared with 21 (47%) of 45 sham group participants (relative risk 1.81, 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.1, P = .02). Long-term responses 24 weeks after completing therapy without additional treatment occurred in 14 (32%) of 44 acupuncture group participants and in 6 (13%) of 45 sham group participants (relative risk 2.39, 95% confidence interval, 1.0-5.6, P = .04). Conclusions: After 10 weeks of treatment, acupuncture proved almost twice as likely as sham treatment to improve CP/CPPS symptoms. Participants receiving acupuncture were 2.4-fold more likely to experience long-term benefit than were participants receiving sham acupuncture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79.e1-79.e7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume121
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acupuncture
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Chronic prostatitis
  • Sham acupuncture
  • Traditional Chinese medicine

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