Active Learning in Large Graduate Classes

Reflections on an “Attaining Citizenship” Simulation

Aleksandar Xavier Deejay, Maria Rost Rublee, Steven Thomas Zech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article details a role-playing “citizenship simulation” used in a large graduate seminar offered by the Masters of International Relations (IR) faculty at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. While recognizing the need for a more systematic analysis of the relationship between class size and active learning strategies, this article offers an anecdotal reflection on the challenges faced when employing active learning in an IR course with growing enrollment numbers. We describe and analyze a simulation used in the graduate course to evaluate the feasibility and desirability of structuring large IR classrooms to include participatory group activities such as simulations. We also hope the simulation provides instructors with an effective sample design for simulations in their own larger courses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-132
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Political Science Education
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • active learning
  • citizenship
  • Large classes
  • simulations

Cite this

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Active Learning in Large Graduate Classes : Reflections on an “Attaining Citizenship” Simulation. / Deejay, Aleksandar Xavier; Rublee, Maria Rost; Zech, Steven Thomas.

In: Journal of Political Science Education, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2019, p. 120-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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