Abortion: Findings from women and men participating in the Understanding Fertility Management in contemporary Australia national survey

Heather Rowe, Sara Holton, Maggie Kirkman, Christine Bayly, Lynne Jordan, Kathleen McNamee, John McBain, Vikki Sinnott, Jane Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background There are few reliable Australian abortion data. The aim was to investigate prevalence, sexual experiences and socioeconomic characteristics of women and men who report having had or being a partner in an abortion. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of women and men aged 18-50 years randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll was used. Weighted multivariable analyses were conducted. Results: Data from 2235 returned (of 15480) mailed surveys were analysed. One in six women and one in 10 men had experienced or been a partner in an abortion. In adjusted analyses, for women, experience of sexual coercion [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46, 3.24] was associated with significantly increased odds of abortion, and socioeconomic advantage (AOR≤0.57; 95% CI 0.39, 0.84), being comfortable negotiating contraceptive use (AOR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09, 0.73) and importance of religion in fertility choices (AOR≤0.55; 95% CI 0.35, 0.87) were associated with significantly reduced odds. For men, sexual coercion (AOR≤3.05; 95% CI 1.51, 6.18) and metropolitan residence (AOR≤1.70; 95% CI 1.06, 2.75) significantly increased the odds of reporting being a partner in an abortion. Conclusions: The findings contribute to scarce information about abortion in Australia. The high prevalence of abortion suggests that effective contraceptive counselling and accessible contraception services are not sufficient, and that there is a continuing need for universal pregnancy advice and abortion services. The association between sexual coercion and abortion warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)566-573
Number of pages8
JournalSexual Health
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • gender
  • pregnancy termination
  • reproductive health
  • social determinants
  • termination of pregnancy.

Cite this

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title = "Abortion: Findings from women and men participating in the Understanding Fertility Management in contemporary Australia national survey",
abstract = "Background There are few reliable Australian abortion data. The aim was to investigate prevalence, sexual experiences and socioeconomic characteristics of women and men who report having had or being a partner in an abortion. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of women and men aged 18-50 years randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll was used. Weighted multivariable analyses were conducted. Results: Data from 2235 returned (of 15480) mailed surveys were analysed. One in six women and one in 10 men had experienced or been a partner in an abortion. In adjusted analyses, for women, experience of sexual coercion [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.18, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.46, 3.24] was associated with significantly increased odds of abortion, and socioeconomic advantage (AOR≤0.57; 95{\%} CI 0.39, 0.84), being comfortable negotiating contraceptive use (AOR 0.26; 95{\%} CI 0.09, 0.73) and importance of religion in fertility choices (AOR≤0.55; 95{\%} CI 0.35, 0.87) were associated with significantly reduced odds. For men, sexual coercion (AOR≤3.05; 95{\%} CI 1.51, 6.18) and metropolitan residence (AOR≤1.70; 95{\%} CI 1.06, 2.75) significantly increased the odds of reporting being a partner in an abortion. Conclusions: The findings contribute to scarce information about abortion in Australia. The high prevalence of abortion suggests that effective contraceptive counselling and accessible contraception services are not sufficient, and that there is a continuing need for universal pregnancy advice and abortion services. The association between sexual coercion and abortion warrants further investigation.",
keywords = "gender, pregnancy termination, reproductive health, social determinants, termination of pregnancy.",
author = "Heather Rowe and Sara Holton and Maggie Kirkman and Christine Bayly and Lynne Jordan and Kathleen McNamee and John McBain and Vikki Sinnott and Jane Fisher",
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Abortion : Findings from women and men participating in the Understanding Fertility Management in contemporary Australia national survey. / Rowe, Heather; Holton, Sara; Kirkman, Maggie; Bayly, Christine; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane.

In: Sexual Health, Vol. 14, No. 6, 01.01.2017, p. 566-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Abortion

T2 - Findings from women and men participating in the Understanding Fertility Management in contemporary Australia national survey

AU - Rowe, Heather

AU - Holton, Sara

AU - Kirkman, Maggie

AU - Bayly, Christine

AU - Jordan, Lynne

AU - McNamee, Kathleen

AU - McBain, John

AU - Sinnott, Vikki

AU - Fisher, Jane

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background There are few reliable Australian abortion data. The aim was to investigate prevalence, sexual experiences and socioeconomic characteristics of women and men who report having had or being a partner in an abortion. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of women and men aged 18-50 years randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll was used. Weighted multivariable analyses were conducted. Results: Data from 2235 returned (of 15480) mailed surveys were analysed. One in six women and one in 10 men had experienced or been a partner in an abortion. In adjusted analyses, for women, experience of sexual coercion [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46, 3.24] was associated with significantly increased odds of abortion, and socioeconomic advantage (AOR≤0.57; 95% CI 0.39, 0.84), being comfortable negotiating contraceptive use (AOR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09, 0.73) and importance of religion in fertility choices (AOR≤0.55; 95% CI 0.35, 0.87) were associated with significantly reduced odds. For men, sexual coercion (AOR≤3.05; 95% CI 1.51, 6.18) and metropolitan residence (AOR≤1.70; 95% CI 1.06, 2.75) significantly increased the odds of reporting being a partner in an abortion. Conclusions: The findings contribute to scarce information about abortion in Australia. The high prevalence of abortion suggests that effective contraceptive counselling and accessible contraception services are not sufficient, and that there is a continuing need for universal pregnancy advice and abortion services. The association between sexual coercion and abortion warrants further investigation.

AB - Background There are few reliable Australian abortion data. The aim was to investigate prevalence, sexual experiences and socioeconomic characteristics of women and men who report having had or being a partner in an abortion. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of women and men aged 18-50 years randomly selected from the Australian Electoral Roll was used. Weighted multivariable analyses were conducted. Results: Data from 2235 returned (of 15480) mailed surveys were analysed. One in six women and one in 10 men had experienced or been a partner in an abortion. In adjusted analyses, for women, experience of sexual coercion [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.18, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46, 3.24] was associated with significantly increased odds of abortion, and socioeconomic advantage (AOR≤0.57; 95% CI 0.39, 0.84), being comfortable negotiating contraceptive use (AOR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09, 0.73) and importance of religion in fertility choices (AOR≤0.55; 95% CI 0.35, 0.87) were associated with significantly reduced odds. For men, sexual coercion (AOR≤3.05; 95% CI 1.51, 6.18) and metropolitan residence (AOR≤1.70; 95% CI 1.06, 2.75) significantly increased the odds of reporting being a partner in an abortion. Conclusions: The findings contribute to scarce information about abortion in Australia. The high prevalence of abortion suggests that effective contraceptive counselling and accessible contraception services are not sufficient, and that there is a continuing need for universal pregnancy advice and abortion services. The association between sexual coercion and abortion warrants further investigation.

KW - gender

KW - pregnancy termination

KW - reproductive health

KW - social determinants

KW - termination of pregnancy.

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U2 - 10.1071/SH17004

DO - 10.1071/SH17004

M3 - Review Article

VL - 14

SP - 566

EP - 573

JO - Sexual Health

JF - Sexual Health

SN - 1448-5028

IS - 6

ER -