Ability of independently ambulant children with cerebral palsy to ride a two-wheel bicycle

a case–control study

Rachel Toovey, Susan M. Reid, Barry Rawicki, Adrienne R. Harvey, Kerrianne Watt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Limited information exists on the ability of children with cerebral palsy (CP) to ride a two-wheel bicycle, an activity that may improve health and participation. We aimed to describe bicycle-riding ability and variables associated with ability to ride in children with CP (Gross Motor Functional Classification System [GMFCS] levels I–II) compared with children with typical development. Method: This case–control study surveyed parents of 114 children with CP and 87 children with typical development aged 6 to 15 years (115 males, mean age 9y 11mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 10mo). Kaplan–Meier methods were used to compare proportions able to ride at any given age between the two groups. Logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with ability to ride for children with CP and typical development separately. Results: The proportion of children with CP able to ride at each level of bicycle-riding ability was substantially lower at each age than peers with typical development (p<0.001). While most children with typical development were able to ride independently by 10 years of age, 51% of children with CP classified as GMFCS level I and 3% of those classified as GMFCS level II had obtained independent riding in the community by 15 years of age. Variables associated with ability to ride for children classified as GMFCS level I were age and parent-rated importance of their child being able to ride. Interpretation: Some independently ambulant children with CP can learn to ride a bicycle, in particular if they are classified as GMFCS level I. Variables associated with ability to ride deserve consideration in shaping future efforts for the majority of this population who are not yet able to ride.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume59
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

Cite this

@article{7e1b9fc541cf4be686ae6187782bb0b3,
title = "Ability of independently ambulant children with cerebral palsy to ride a two-wheel bicycle: a case–control study",
abstract = "Aim: Limited information exists on the ability of children with cerebral palsy (CP) to ride a two-wheel bicycle, an activity that may improve health and participation. We aimed to describe bicycle-riding ability and variables associated with ability to ride in children with CP (Gross Motor Functional Classification System [GMFCS] levels I–II) compared with children with typical development. Method: This case–control study surveyed parents of 114 children with CP and 87 children with typical development aged 6 to 15 years (115 males, mean age 9y 11mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 10mo). Kaplan–Meier methods were used to compare proportions able to ride at any given age between the two groups. Logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with ability to ride for children with CP and typical development separately. Results: The proportion of children with CP able to ride at each level of bicycle-riding ability was substantially lower at each age than peers with typical development (p<0.001). While most children with typical development were able to ride independently by 10 years of age, 51{\%} of children with CP classified as GMFCS level I and 3{\%} of those classified as GMFCS level II had obtained independent riding in the community by 15 years of age. Variables associated with ability to ride for children classified as GMFCS level I were age and parent-rated importance of their child being able to ride. Interpretation: Some independently ambulant children with CP can learn to ride a bicycle, in particular if they are classified as GMFCS level I. Variables associated with ability to ride deserve consideration in shaping future efforts for the majority of this population who are not yet able to ride.",
author = "Rachel Toovey and Reid, {Susan M.} and Barry Rawicki and Harvey, {Adrienne R.} and Kerrianne Watt",
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language = "English",
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Ability of independently ambulant children with cerebral palsy to ride a two-wheel bicycle : a case–control study. / Toovey, Rachel; Reid, Susan M.; Rawicki, Barry; Harvey, Adrienne R.; Watt, Kerrianne.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 59, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 395-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ability of independently ambulant children with cerebral palsy to ride a two-wheel bicycle

T2 - a case–control study

AU - Toovey, Rachel

AU - Reid, Susan M.

AU - Rawicki, Barry

AU - Harvey, Adrienne R.

AU - Watt, Kerrianne

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Aim: Limited information exists on the ability of children with cerebral palsy (CP) to ride a two-wheel bicycle, an activity that may improve health and participation. We aimed to describe bicycle-riding ability and variables associated with ability to ride in children with CP (Gross Motor Functional Classification System [GMFCS] levels I–II) compared with children with typical development. Method: This case–control study surveyed parents of 114 children with CP and 87 children with typical development aged 6 to 15 years (115 males, mean age 9y 11mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 10mo). Kaplan–Meier methods were used to compare proportions able to ride at any given age between the two groups. Logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with ability to ride for children with CP and typical development separately. Results: The proportion of children with CP able to ride at each level of bicycle-riding ability was substantially lower at each age than peers with typical development (p<0.001). While most children with typical development were able to ride independently by 10 years of age, 51% of children with CP classified as GMFCS level I and 3% of those classified as GMFCS level II had obtained independent riding in the community by 15 years of age. Variables associated with ability to ride for children classified as GMFCS level I were age and parent-rated importance of their child being able to ride. Interpretation: Some independently ambulant children with CP can learn to ride a bicycle, in particular if they are classified as GMFCS level I. Variables associated with ability to ride deserve consideration in shaping future efforts for the majority of this population who are not yet able to ride.

AB - Aim: Limited information exists on the ability of children with cerebral palsy (CP) to ride a two-wheel bicycle, an activity that may improve health and participation. We aimed to describe bicycle-riding ability and variables associated with ability to ride in children with CP (Gross Motor Functional Classification System [GMFCS] levels I–II) compared with children with typical development. Method: This case–control study surveyed parents of 114 children with CP and 87 children with typical development aged 6 to 15 years (115 males, mean age 9y 11mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 10mo). Kaplan–Meier methods were used to compare proportions able to ride at any given age between the two groups. Logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with ability to ride for children with CP and typical development separately. Results: The proportion of children with CP able to ride at each level of bicycle-riding ability was substantially lower at each age than peers with typical development (p<0.001). While most children with typical development were able to ride independently by 10 years of age, 51% of children with CP classified as GMFCS level I and 3% of those classified as GMFCS level II had obtained independent riding in the community by 15 years of age. Variables associated with ability to ride for children classified as GMFCS level I were age and parent-rated importance of their child being able to ride. Interpretation: Some independently ambulant children with CP can learn to ride a bicycle, in particular if they are classified as GMFCS level I. Variables associated with ability to ride deserve consideration in shaping future efforts for the majority of this population who are not yet able to ride.

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U2 - 10.1111/dmcn.13340

DO - 10.1111/dmcn.13340

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 395

EP - 401

JO - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

JF - Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology

SN - 0012-1622

IS - 4

ER -