A ‘Tripadvisor’ for disability? Social enterprise and ‘digital disruption’ in Australia

Ian McLoughlin, Yolande McNicoll, Aviva Beecher Kelk, James Cornford, Kelly Hutchinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We explore how social enterprises can use platform technologies to plug ‘informational gaps’ in the provision of disability services. Such gaps are made more apparent by policies promoting self-directed care as a means of giving service users more choice and control. We use a case study of a start-up social enterprise seeking to provide a TripAdvisor style service to examine the potential for social innovation to ‘disrupt’ current models of service. The case study suggests that any disruptive effects of such changes are not due to new digital technology per se, nor to novel platform business models, but rather rest in the manner in which the moral orders which justify current patterns of social disablement can be challenged by social innovation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)521-537
Number of pages17
JournalInformation, Communication and Society
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • digital disruption
  • Digital social innovation
  • disability
  • social innovation

Cite this

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A ‘Tripadvisor’ for disability? Social enterprise and ‘digital disruption’ in Australia. / McLoughlin, Ian; McNicoll, Yolande; Beecher Kelk, Aviva; Cornford, James; Hutchinson, Kelly.

In: Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2019, p. 521-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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