A systematic review of obesity prevention intervention studies among immigrant populations in the US

Alison Tovar, Andre Renzaho, Alma Guerrero, Noereem Mena, Guadalupe Ayala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this review was to systematically assess the effectiveness of obesity prevention and control interventions in US immigrant populations across the life course, from preschool-age to adults. A systematic review of relevant studies was undertaken and eligible articles included. The initial search identified 684 potentially relevant articles, of which only 20 articles met the selection criteria, representing 20 unique studies. They were divided into interventions that targeted adults (n=7), interventions that targeted children (n=5) and pilot studies (n=8). The majority of interventions targeted Latinos, predominately Mexican-origin populations. Among the interventions targeting adults, five had an effect on obesity related outcomes. However, they tended to use less rigorous study designs. Among the interventions that targeted children, three had a positive effect on obesity-related outcomes. Three of the eight pilot studies had an effect on obesity-related outcomes. There is a paucity of data on effective interventions but a great need to address obesity prevention to help inform health policies and programs to reduce migration-related obesity inequalities
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206 - 222
Number of pages17
JournalCurrent Obesity Reports
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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