A survey of homework use, experience of barriers to homework, and attitudes about the barriers to homework among couples and family therapists

Frank M Dattilio, Nikolaos Kazantzis, Gregg Shinkfield, Amanda G Carr Eckhardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Homework is a therapeutic process that has strong theoretical and empirical basis, but existing research has focused on compliance rather than considering the broader and more clinically meaningful construct of engagement. Absent in the literature is empirical study of the barriers to engagement or study of homework use among couple and family therapists (CFTs). The current study investigates the frequency and type of homework, as well as the influence of homework compliance, quality of compliance, and experience of barriers to compliance on CFTs attitudes and beliefs toward barriers to homework completion for couples and families. Results indicated CFTs (N=226 AAMFT Clinical members) use homework more often with couples than with families, and CFTs report greater homework compliance and quality of compliance for couples when compared to families. A path analysis examining compliance, quality of compliance, and barriers to compliance as predictors of attitudes/beliefs toward barriers revealed no significant findings. A discussion presents implications for future research and practice for homework in couple and family therapy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121 - 136
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{4b9694a7cc8b4592bc397dc9e7c1bcab,
title = "A survey of homework use, experience of barriers to homework, and attitudes about the barriers to homework among couples and family therapists",
abstract = "Homework is a therapeutic process that has strong theoretical and empirical basis, but existing research has focused on compliance rather than considering the broader and more clinically meaningful construct of engagement. Absent in the literature is empirical study of the barriers to engagement or study of homework use among couple and family therapists (CFTs). The current study investigates the frequency and type of homework, as well as the influence of homework compliance, quality of compliance, and experience of barriers to compliance on CFTs attitudes and beliefs toward barriers to homework completion for couples and families. Results indicated CFTs (N=226 AAMFT Clinical members) use homework more often with couples than with families, and CFTs report greater homework compliance and quality of compliance for couples when compared to families. A path analysis examining compliance, quality of compliance, and barriers to compliance as predictors of attitudes/beliefs toward barriers revealed no significant findings. A discussion presents implications for future research and practice for homework in couple and family therapy.",
author = "Dattilio, {Frank M} and Nikolaos Kazantzis and Gregg Shinkfield and {Carr Eckhardt}, {Amanda G}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00223.x",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "121 -- 136",
journal = "Journal of Marital and Family Therapy",
issn = "0194-472X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

A survey of homework use, experience of barriers to homework, and attitudes about the barriers to homework among couples and family therapists. / Dattilio, Frank M; Kazantzis, Nikolaos; Shinkfield, Gregg; Carr Eckhardt, Amanda G.

In: Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Vol. 37, No. 2, 2011, p. 121 - 136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A survey of homework use, experience of barriers to homework, and attitudes about the barriers to homework among couples and family therapists

AU - Dattilio, Frank M

AU - Kazantzis, Nikolaos

AU - Shinkfield, Gregg

AU - Carr Eckhardt, Amanda G

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Homework is a therapeutic process that has strong theoretical and empirical basis, but existing research has focused on compliance rather than considering the broader and more clinically meaningful construct of engagement. Absent in the literature is empirical study of the barriers to engagement or study of homework use among couple and family therapists (CFTs). The current study investigates the frequency and type of homework, as well as the influence of homework compliance, quality of compliance, and experience of barriers to compliance on CFTs attitudes and beliefs toward barriers to homework completion for couples and families. Results indicated CFTs (N=226 AAMFT Clinical members) use homework more often with couples than with families, and CFTs report greater homework compliance and quality of compliance for couples when compared to families. A path analysis examining compliance, quality of compliance, and barriers to compliance as predictors of attitudes/beliefs toward barriers revealed no significant findings. A discussion presents implications for future research and practice for homework in couple and family therapy.

AB - Homework is a therapeutic process that has strong theoretical and empirical basis, but existing research has focused on compliance rather than considering the broader and more clinically meaningful construct of engagement. Absent in the literature is empirical study of the barriers to engagement or study of homework use among couple and family therapists (CFTs). The current study investigates the frequency and type of homework, as well as the influence of homework compliance, quality of compliance, and experience of barriers to compliance on CFTs attitudes and beliefs toward barriers to homework completion for couples and families. Results indicated CFTs (N=226 AAMFT Clinical members) use homework more often with couples than with families, and CFTs report greater homework compliance and quality of compliance for couples when compared to families. A path analysis examining compliance, quality of compliance, and barriers to compliance as predictors of attitudes/beliefs toward barriers revealed no significant findings. A discussion presents implications for future research and practice for homework in couple and family therapy.

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00223.x/pdf

U2 - 10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00223.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00223.x

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 121

EP - 136

JO - Journal of Marital and Family Therapy

JF - Journal of Marital and Family Therapy

SN - 0194-472X

IS - 2

ER -