A retrospective study on breast cancer presentation, risk factors, and protective factors in patients with a positive family history of breast cancer

Ying Yi Liaw, Foong Shiang Loong, Suzanne Tan, Sze Yun On, Evelyn Khaw, Yilynn Chiew, Rusli Nordin, Tuan Nur Mat, Sarojah Arulanantham, Anil Gandhi

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    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Women with a positive family history of breast cancer are greatly predisposed to breast cancer development. From January 2007 to December 2016, 1101 patients with a histologically confirmed breast cancer were divided into two groups: patients with and without a positive family history of breast cancer. Variables including age at presentation, ethnicity, tumor size, age at menarche, age at menopause, oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), alcohol intake, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, parity, and breastfeeding were recorded. One hundred and fifty-nine out of 1101 (14.4%) of the patients had a family history of breast cancer. There was no significant difference in the incidence of breast cancer among Malays, Chinese, and Indians. Both patient groups presented at a mean age of about 60 years (+FH 60; -FH 61.2 P-value =.218). Significantly higher prevalence of history of benign breast disease (11.3%, P.018), nulliparity (13.2%, P.014), tumor size at presentation of more than 5 cm (47.3%, P 0.001), and bilateral site presentation (3.1%, P 0.029) were noted among respondents with a positive family history of breast cancer compared to those with a negative family history of breast cancer. The odds of having a tumor size larger than 5cm at presentation were almost two times higher in patients with a positive family history as compared to those without a family history (adjusted OR = 1.786, 95% CI 1.211-2.484) (P-value.003). Women in Malaysia, despite having a positive family history of breast cancer, still present late at a mean age of 60 with a large tumor size of more than 5 cm, reflecting a lack of awareness. Breastfeeding does not protect women with a family history from developing breast cancer.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)469-473
    Number of pages5
    JournalBreast Journal
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

    Keywords

    • breast cancer
    • clinical presentation
    • family history
    • Malaysian women
    • risk factors

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