A real-world evidence analysis of associations among costs, quality of life, and disease-severity indicators of alzheimer's disease in Thailand

Khachen Kongpakwattana, Charungthai Dejthevaporn, Orapitchaya Krairit, Piyameth Dilokthornsakul, Devi Mohan, Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk

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    Abstract

    Background: Although an increase in the burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is evident worldwide, knowledge of costs and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) associated with AD in low- and middle-income countries is still lacking. Objectives: This study aimed to collect real-world cost and HRQOL data, and investigate their associations with multiple disease-severity indicators among AD patients in Thailand. Methods: We recruited AD patients aged ≥60 years accompanied by their caregivers at a university-affiliated tertiary hospital. A one-time structured interview was conducted to collect disease-severity indicators, HRQOL, and caregiving information using standardized tools. The hospital's database was used to retrieve healthcare resource utilization occurred over 6 months preceding the interview date. Costs were annualized and stratified based on cognitive status. Generalized linear models were employed to evaluate determinants of costs and HRQOL. Results: Among 148 community-dwelling patients, average annual total societal costs of AD care were $8014 (95% confidence interval [CI]: $7295-$8844) per patient. Total costs of patients with severe stage ($9860; 95% CI: $8785-$11 328) were almost twice as high as those of mild stage ($5524; 95% CI: $4649-$6593). The major cost driver was direct medical costs, particularly those incurred by AD prescriptions. Functional status was the strongest determinant for both total costs and patient's HRQOL (P value <.001). Conclusion: Our real-world findings suggest the distinct major cost driver that results from expensive AD treatment, emphasizing the demand of country-specific cost evidence. Increases in cognitive and functional status are significantly associated with decreases in total costs of AD care and improvement in patient's HRQOL.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1137-1145
    Number of pages9
    JournalValue in Health
    Volume22
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

    Keywords

    • Alzheimer's disease
    • costs
    • health-related quality of life

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