A prospective comparison of cold snare polypectomy using traditional or dedicated cold snares for the resection of small sessile colorectal polyps

Jeremy P. Dwyer, Jonathan Y. C. Tan, Paul Urquhart, Robyn Secomb, Catherine Bunn, John Reynolds, Richard La Nauze, William Kemp, Stuart Roberts, Gregor Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background and study aims The evidence for efficacy and safety of cold snare polypectomy is limited. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of resection and safety of cold snare polypectomy, using either traditional or dedicated cold snares.

Patients and methods This was a prospective, non-randomized study performed at a single tertiary hospital. Adult patients with at least one colorectal polyp (size ≤ 10 mm) removed by cold snare were included. In the first phase, all patients had polyps removed by traditional snare without diathermy. In the second phase, all patients had polyps removed by dedicated cold snare. Complete endoscopic resection was determined from histological examination of quadrantic polypectomy margin biopsies. Immediate or delayed bleeding within 2 weeks was recorded.

Results In total, 181 patients with 299 eligible polyps (n = 93 (173 polyps) traditional snare group, n = 88 (126 polyps) dedicated cold snare group) were included. Patient demographics and procedure indications were similar between groups. Mean polyp size was 6 mm in both groups (P = 0.25). Complete polyp resection was 165 /173 (95.4 %; 95 %CI 90.5 – 97.6 %) in the traditional snare group and 124/126 (98.4 %; 95 %CI 93.7 – 99.6 %) in the dedicated cold snare group (P = 0.16). Serrated polyps, compared with adenomatous polyps, had a higher rate of incomplete resection (7 % vs. 2 %, P = 0.03). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of immediate bleeding (3 % vs. 1 %, P = 0.41) and there were no delayed hemorrhages or perforations.

Conclusions Cold snare polypectomy is effective and safe for the complete endoscopic resection of small (≤ 10 mm) colorectal polyps with either traditional or dedicated cold snares.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E1062-E1068
Number of pages7
JournalEndosc Int Open
Volume05
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2017

Cite this

@article{fc2f5b264c174b0cbd46892b38daf160,
title = "A prospective comparison of cold snare polypectomy using traditional or dedicated cold snares for the resection of small sessile colorectal polyps",
abstract = "Background and study aims The evidence for efficacy and safety of cold snare polypectomy is limited. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of resection and safety of cold snare polypectomy, using either traditional or dedicated cold snares.Patients and methods This was a prospective, non-randomized study performed at a single tertiary hospital. Adult patients with at least one colorectal polyp (size ≤ 10 mm) removed by cold snare were included. In the first phase, all patients had polyps removed by traditional snare without diathermy. In the second phase, all patients had polyps removed by dedicated cold snare. Complete endoscopic resection was determined from histological examination of quadrantic polypectomy margin biopsies. Immediate or delayed bleeding within 2 weeks was recorded.Results In total, 181 patients with 299 eligible polyps (n = 93 (173 polyps) traditional snare group, n = 88 (126 polyps) dedicated cold snare group) were included. Patient demographics and procedure indications were similar between groups. Mean polyp size was 6 mm in both groups (P = 0.25). Complete polyp resection was 165 /173 (95.4 {\%}; 95 {\%}CI 90.5 – 97.6 {\%}) in the traditional snare group and 124/126 (98.4 {\%}; 95 {\%}CI 93.7 – 99.6 {\%}) in the dedicated cold snare group (P = 0.16). Serrated polyps, compared with adenomatous polyps, had a higher rate of incomplete resection (7 {\%} vs. 2 {\%}, P = 0.03). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of immediate bleeding (3 {\%} vs. 1 {\%}, P = 0.41) and there were no delayed hemorrhages or perforations.Conclusions Cold snare polypectomy is effective and safe for the complete endoscopic resection of small (≤ 10 mm) colorectal polyps with either traditional or dedicated cold snares.",
author = "Dwyer, {Jeremy P.} and Tan, {Jonathan Y. C.} and Paul Urquhart and Robyn Secomb and Catherine Bunn and John Reynolds and {La Nauze}, Richard and William Kemp and Stuart Roberts and Gregor Brown",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1055/s-0043-113564",
language = "English",
volume = "05",
pages = "E1062--E1068",
journal = "Endosc Int Open",
issn = "2364-3722",
publisher = "Thieme Publishing",
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A prospective comparison of cold snare polypectomy using traditional or dedicated cold snares for the resection of small sessile colorectal polyps. / Dwyer, Jeremy P.; Tan, Jonathan Y. C.; Urquhart, Paul; Secomb, Robyn; Bunn, Catherine; Reynolds, John; La Nauze, Richard; Kemp, William; Roberts, Stuart; Brown, Gregor.

In: Endosc Int Open, Vol. 05, No. 11, 27.10.2017, p. E1062-E1068.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A prospective comparison of cold snare polypectomy using traditional or dedicated cold snares for the resection of small sessile colorectal polyps

AU - Dwyer, Jeremy P.

AU - Tan, Jonathan Y. C.

AU - Urquhart, Paul

AU - Secomb, Robyn

AU - Bunn, Catherine

AU - Reynolds, John

AU - La Nauze, Richard

AU - Kemp, William

AU - Roberts, Stuart

AU - Brown, Gregor

PY - 2017/10/27

Y1 - 2017/10/27

N2 - Background and study aims The evidence for efficacy and safety of cold snare polypectomy is limited. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of resection and safety of cold snare polypectomy, using either traditional or dedicated cold snares.Patients and methods This was a prospective, non-randomized study performed at a single tertiary hospital. Adult patients with at least one colorectal polyp (size ≤ 10 mm) removed by cold snare were included. In the first phase, all patients had polyps removed by traditional snare without diathermy. In the second phase, all patients had polyps removed by dedicated cold snare. Complete endoscopic resection was determined from histological examination of quadrantic polypectomy margin biopsies. Immediate or delayed bleeding within 2 weeks was recorded.Results In total, 181 patients with 299 eligible polyps (n = 93 (173 polyps) traditional snare group, n = 88 (126 polyps) dedicated cold snare group) were included. Patient demographics and procedure indications were similar between groups. Mean polyp size was 6 mm in both groups (P = 0.25). Complete polyp resection was 165 /173 (95.4 %; 95 %CI 90.5 – 97.6 %) in the traditional snare group and 124/126 (98.4 %; 95 %CI 93.7 – 99.6 %) in the dedicated cold snare group (P = 0.16). Serrated polyps, compared with adenomatous polyps, had a higher rate of incomplete resection (7 % vs. 2 %, P = 0.03). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of immediate bleeding (3 % vs. 1 %, P = 0.41) and there were no delayed hemorrhages or perforations.Conclusions Cold snare polypectomy is effective and safe for the complete endoscopic resection of small (≤ 10 mm) colorectal polyps with either traditional or dedicated cold snares.

AB - Background and study aims The evidence for efficacy and safety of cold snare polypectomy is limited. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of resection and safety of cold snare polypectomy, using either traditional or dedicated cold snares.Patients and methods This was a prospective, non-randomized study performed at a single tertiary hospital. Adult patients with at least one colorectal polyp (size ≤ 10 mm) removed by cold snare were included. In the first phase, all patients had polyps removed by traditional snare without diathermy. In the second phase, all patients had polyps removed by dedicated cold snare. Complete endoscopic resection was determined from histological examination of quadrantic polypectomy margin biopsies. Immediate or delayed bleeding within 2 weeks was recorded.Results In total, 181 patients with 299 eligible polyps (n = 93 (173 polyps) traditional snare group, n = 88 (126 polyps) dedicated cold snare group) were included. Patient demographics and procedure indications were similar between groups. Mean polyp size was 6 mm in both groups (P = 0.25). Complete polyp resection was 165 /173 (95.4 %; 95 %CI 90.5 – 97.6 %) in the traditional snare group and 124/126 (98.4 %; 95 %CI 93.7 – 99.6 %) in the dedicated cold snare group (P = 0.16). Serrated polyps, compared with adenomatous polyps, had a higher rate of incomplete resection (7 % vs. 2 %, P = 0.03). There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of immediate bleeding (3 % vs. 1 %, P = 0.41) and there were no delayed hemorrhages or perforations.Conclusions Cold snare polypectomy is effective and safe for the complete endoscopic resection of small (≤ 10 mm) colorectal polyps with either traditional or dedicated cold snares.

U2 - 10.1055/s-0043-113564

DO - 10.1055/s-0043-113564

M3 - Article

VL - 05

SP - E1062-E1068

JO - Endosc Int Open

JF - Endosc Int Open

SN - 2364-3722

IS - 11

ER -