A pilot randomized controlled trial of a tailored cognitive behavioural therapy based intervention for depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

Litza A. Kiropoulos, Trevor Kilpatrick, Alex Holmes, Jennifer Threader

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of an 8-week individual tailored cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Methods: The current study presents a pilot, parallel group randomized controlled trial (RCT) with an allocation ratio of 1:1 conducted in a large research and teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. 30 individuals with a mean age of 36.93years (SD=9.63) who were newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) (X=24.87months, SD=15.61) were randomized to the CBT intervention (n=15) or treatment as usual (TAU) (n=15). The primary outcome was level of depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcomes were level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, coping, acceptance of MS illness, MS related quality of life, social support, and resilience. Tertiary outcomes were acceptability and adherence to the intervention. Results: Large between group treatment effects were found for level of depressive symptoms at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=1.66-1.34). There were also small to large group treatment effects for level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, MS related quality of life, resilience, and social support at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=0.17-1.63). There were no drop-outs and participants completed all treatment modules. All participants reported the treatment as 'very useful', and most (73.4%) reported that the intervention had addressed their problems 'completely'. Conclusions: These data suggest that the tailored early intervention is appropriate and clinically effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with MS. A larger RCT comparing the CBT intervention with an active comparative treatment with longer term follow-up and cost effectiveness analyses is warranted. The pilot trial has been retrospectively registered on 28/04/2016 with the ISRCTN registry (trial ID ISRCTN10423371).

Original languageEnglish
Article number435
Number of pages10
JournalBMC Psychiatry
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
  • Depression
  • Early intervention
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Newly diagnosed

Cite this

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title = "A pilot randomized controlled trial of a tailored cognitive behavioural therapy based intervention for depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Background: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of an 8-week individual tailored cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Methods: The current study presents a pilot, parallel group randomized controlled trial (RCT) with an allocation ratio of 1:1 conducted in a large research and teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. 30 individuals with a mean age of 36.93years (SD=9.63) who were newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) (X=24.87months, SD=15.61) were randomized to the CBT intervention (n=15) or treatment as usual (TAU) (n=15). The primary outcome was level of depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcomes were level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, coping, acceptance of MS illness, MS related quality of life, social support, and resilience. Tertiary outcomes were acceptability and adherence to the intervention. Results: Large between group treatment effects were found for level of depressive symptoms at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=1.66-1.34). There were also small to large group treatment effects for level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, MS related quality of life, resilience, and social support at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=0.17-1.63). There were no drop-outs and participants completed all treatment modules. All participants reported the treatment as 'very useful', and most (73.4{\%}) reported that the intervention had addressed their problems 'completely'. Conclusions: These data suggest that the tailored early intervention is appropriate and clinically effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with MS. A larger RCT comparing the CBT intervention with an active comparative treatment with longer term follow-up and cost effectiveness analyses is warranted. The pilot trial has been retrospectively registered on 28/04/2016 with the ISRCTN registry (trial ID ISRCTN10423371).",
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A pilot randomized controlled trial of a tailored cognitive behavioural therapy based intervention for depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. / Kiropoulos, Litza A.; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Holmes, Alex; Threader, Jennifer.

In: BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 1, 435, 07.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - Background: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of an 8-week individual tailored cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Methods: The current study presents a pilot, parallel group randomized controlled trial (RCT) with an allocation ratio of 1:1 conducted in a large research and teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. 30 individuals with a mean age of 36.93years (SD=9.63) who were newly diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) (X=24.87months, SD=15.61) were randomized to the CBT intervention (n=15) or treatment as usual (TAU) (n=15). The primary outcome was level of depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Secondary outcomes were level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, coping, acceptance of MS illness, MS related quality of life, social support, and resilience. Tertiary outcomes were acceptability and adherence to the intervention. Results: Large between group treatment effects were found for level of depressive symptoms at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=1.66-1.34). There were also small to large group treatment effects for level of anxiety, fatigue and pain impact, sleep quality, MS related quality of life, resilience, and social support at post and at 20weeks follow-up (d=0.17-1.63). There were no drop-outs and participants completed all treatment modules. All participants reported the treatment as 'very useful', and most (73.4%) reported that the intervention had addressed their problems 'completely'. Conclusions: These data suggest that the tailored early intervention is appropriate and clinically effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in those newly diagnosed with MS. A larger RCT comparing the CBT intervention with an active comparative treatment with longer term follow-up and cost effectiveness analyses is warranted. The pilot trial has been retrospectively registered on 28/04/2016 with the ISRCTN registry (trial ID ISRCTN10423371).

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