A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We report on development of an analytical approach for governing curriculum innovation in Biomedical Sciences (BMS). This approach conceives skills as multidimensional and situational, and recognises the difficulty of meeting the employability agenda from within a higher-education setting. Our project began with an analysis of the Research Skills Development Framework (Willison & O’Regan, 2007), which provides an appealing structure for enhancing skill development within the undergraduate BMS curriculum. But as we deconstructed this framework, we identified skills that appeared to sit across a number of almost independent skills ‘agendas’, including ‘employability’, life long learning, research and discipline-specific skills. An attempt to map the different agendas and skills onto our curriculum resulted in a number of complex and often poorly defined notions of skills and attributes. The broad generic graduate attribute statements blurred boundaries between hard skills on one hand, and attitudes and behaviours (attributes) on the other, and obscured the underpinning pedagogy around how we define and assess intangible attributes within a higher education setting. We recognized that skills were complex domains and that simply teaching a skill in one context (e.g. a discipline setting) did not ensure that skill was then transferable (e.g. to the work place). To successfully transfer skills to different contexts required additional learning steps. This paper provides a foundation for re-visualising how personal and academic development is configured within the curriculum, as well as strategies for supporting and assessing skills development and graduate capabilities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch and Development in Higher Education
Subtitle of host publicationLearning for Life and Work in a Complex World
EditorsT. Thomas, E. Levin, P. Dawson, K. Fraser, R. Hadgraft
Place of PublicationMilperra, NSW
PublisherHigher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia
Pages307-317
Number of pages10
Volume38
ISBN (Print)9780908557967
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
EventHigher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2015 - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre (MCEC), Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 6 Jul 20159 Jul 2015
Conference number: 38th
http://herdsa.org.au/research-and-development-higher-education-vol-38

Conference

ConferenceHigher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleHERDSA 2015
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period6/07/159/07/15
Other38th Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) Annual International Conference

Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World
Internet address

Keywords

  • skills framework
  • employability
  • transferable skills

Cite this

Mayne, L. V., Choate, J. K., & Zahora, T. (2015). A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences. In T. Thomas, E. Levin, P. Dawson, K. Fraser, & R. Hadgraft (Eds.), Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World (Vol. 38, pp. 307-317). Milperra, NSW: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia. Higher Education Research and Development
Mayne, L.V. ; Choate, J.K. ; Zahora, T. / A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences. Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World. editor / T. Thomas ; E. Levin ; P. Dawson ; K. Fraser ; R. Hadgraft. Vol. 38 Milperra, NSW : Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, 2015. pp. 307-317 (Higher Education Research and Development).
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abstract = "We report on development of an analytical approach for governing curriculum innovation in Biomedical Sciences (BMS). This approach conceives skills as multidimensional and situational, and recognises the difficulty of meeting the employability agenda from within a higher-education setting. Our project began with an analysis of the Research Skills Development Framework (Willison & O’Regan, 2007), which provides an appealing structure for enhancing skill development within the undergraduate BMS curriculum. But as we deconstructed this framework, we identified skills that appeared to sit across a number of almost independent skills ‘agendas’, including ‘employability’, life long learning, research and discipline-specific skills. An attempt to map the different agendas and skills onto our curriculum resulted in a number of complex and often poorly defined notions of skills and attributes. The broad generic graduate attribute statements blurred boundaries between hard skills on one hand, and attitudes and behaviours (attributes) on the other, and obscured the underpinning pedagogy around how we define and assess intangible attributes within a higher education setting. We recognized that skills were complex domains and that simply teaching a skill in one context (e.g. a discipline setting) did not ensure that skill was then transferable (e.g. to the work place). To successfully transfer skills to different contexts required additional learning steps. This paper provides a foundation for re-visualising how personal and academic development is configured within the curriculum, as well as strategies for supporting and assessing skills development and graduate capabilities.",
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Mayne, LV, Choate, JK & Zahora, T 2015, A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences. in T Thomas, E Levin, P Dawson, K Fraser & R Hadgraft (eds), Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World. vol. 38, Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, Milperra, NSW, Higher Education Research and Development, pp. 307-317, Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia Annual Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia, 6/07/15.

A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences. / Mayne, L.V.; Choate, J.K.; Zahora, T.

Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World. ed. / T. Thomas; E. Levin; P. Dawson; K. Fraser; R. Hadgraft. Vol. 38 Milperra, NSW : Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia, 2015. p. 307-317 (Higher Education Research and Development).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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AB - We report on development of an analytical approach for governing curriculum innovation in Biomedical Sciences (BMS). This approach conceives skills as multidimensional and situational, and recognises the difficulty of meeting the employability agenda from within a higher-education setting. Our project began with an analysis of the Research Skills Development Framework (Willison & O’Regan, 2007), which provides an appealing structure for enhancing skill development within the undergraduate BMS curriculum. But as we deconstructed this framework, we identified skills that appeared to sit across a number of almost independent skills ‘agendas’, including ‘employability’, life long learning, research and discipline-specific skills. An attempt to map the different agendas and skills onto our curriculum resulted in a number of complex and often poorly defined notions of skills and attributes. The broad generic graduate attribute statements blurred boundaries between hard skills on one hand, and attitudes and behaviours (attributes) on the other, and obscured the underpinning pedagogy around how we define and assess intangible attributes within a higher education setting. We recognized that skills were complex domains and that simply teaching a skill in one context (e.g. a discipline setting) did not ensure that skill was then transferable (e.g. to the work place). To successfully transfer skills to different contexts required additional learning steps. This paper provides a foundation for re-visualising how personal and academic development is configured within the curriculum, as well as strategies for supporting and assessing skills development and graduate capabilities.

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BT - Research and Development in Higher Education

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A2 - Levin, E.

A2 - Dawson, P.

A2 - Fraser, K.

A2 - Hadgraft, R.

PB - Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia

CY - Milperra, NSW

ER -

Mayne LV, Choate JK, Zahora T. A pathway towards a holistic skills framework in biomedical sciences. In Thomas T, Levin E, Dawson P, Fraser K, Hadgraft R, editors, Research and Development in Higher Education: Learning for Life and Work in a Complex World. Vol. 38. Milperra, NSW: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia. 2015. p. 307-317. (Higher Education Research and Development).