A novel online platform promotes asynchronous class preparation and thought transparency

Jaekyu Shin, Katherine Gruenberg, Tina Brock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background and purpose: Engaging all learners with self-directed class preparation materials can be challenging. The purpose of this study is to assess student perceptions of a novel app and web-based program, Practice Improvement using Virtual Online Training (PIVOT) as a preparatory tool in a pharmacy therapeutics course. Educational activity and setting: PIVOT was designed to encourage self-directed information gathering, group collaboration, and problem-solving prior to classes. Students accessed PIVOT to obtain patient information and provide responses to questions. A semi-structured large group case discussion, facilitated by the instructor, followed the preparatory assignment. All students were invited to participate in pre-/post-activity online surveys to evaluate their experiences. Findings: One hundred and ten students (92.4%) completed both surveys. Students identified viewing/comparing answers with classmates (73%), enforcing preparation (51%), and asynchronous preparation (51%) as useful aspects of PIVOT. Working with a group (42%) and organizing patient information (32%) were selected as negative aspects of PIVOT. More than half of students preferred not to use PIVOT for class preparation, but 41% of students would like to see PIVOT integrated in their therapeutics courses. Integrating PIVOT into a pharmacy therapeutics course resulted in mixed student perceptions. Several helpful aspects of this platform were identified and a majority suggested drawbacks that are also common features of actual pharmacy practice. Implementing PIVOT in a different learning context may improve student perceptions.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Asynchronous learning
  • Class preparation
  • Educational techniques
  • Mobile applications
  • Pharmacy students
  • Virtual patient cases

Cite this

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title = "A novel online platform promotes asynchronous class preparation and thought transparency",
abstract = "Background and purpose: Engaging all learners with self-directed class preparation materials can be challenging. The purpose of this study is to assess student perceptions of a novel app and web-based program, Practice Improvement using Virtual Online Training (PIVOT) as a preparatory tool in a pharmacy therapeutics course. Educational activity and setting: PIVOT was designed to encourage self-directed information gathering, group collaboration, and problem-solving prior to classes. Students accessed PIVOT to obtain patient information and provide responses to questions. A semi-structured large group case discussion, facilitated by the instructor, followed the preparatory assignment. All students were invited to participate in pre-/post-activity online surveys to evaluate their experiences. Findings: One hundred and ten students (92.4{\%}) completed both surveys. Students identified viewing/comparing answers with classmates (73{\%}), enforcing preparation (51{\%}), and asynchronous preparation (51{\%}) as useful aspects of PIVOT. Working with a group (42{\%}) and organizing patient information (32{\%}) were selected as negative aspects of PIVOT. More than half of students preferred not to use PIVOT for class preparation, but 41{\%} of students would like to see PIVOT integrated in their therapeutics courses. Integrating PIVOT into a pharmacy therapeutics course resulted in mixed student perceptions. Several helpful aspects of this platform were identified and a majority suggested drawbacks that are also common features of actual pharmacy practice. Implementing PIVOT in a different learning context may improve student perceptions.",
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A novel online platform promotes asynchronous class preparation and thought transparency. / Shin, Jaekyu; Gruenberg, Katherine; Brock, Tina.

In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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