A model analysis of arterial oxygen desaturation during apnea in preterm infants

Scott Sands, Bradley Allan Edwards, Vanessa Jane Kelly, Malcolm Davidson, Malcolm Howard Wilkinson, Philip John Berger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid arterial O2 desaturation during apnea in the preterm infant has obvious clinical implications but to date no adequate explanation for why it exists. Understanding the factors influencing the rate of arterial O2 desaturation during apnea (ṠaO2) is complicated by the non-linear O2 dissociation curve, falling pulmonary O 2 uptake, and by the fact that O2 desaturation is biphasic, exhibiting a rapid phase (stage 1) followed by a slower phase when severe desaturation develops (stage 2). Using a mathematical model incorporating pulmonary uptake dynamics, we found that elevated metabolic O2 consumption accelerates ṠaO2 throughout the entire desaturation process. By contrast, the remaining factors have a restricted temporal influence: low pre-apneic alveolar PO2 causes an early onset of desaturation, but thereafter has little impact; reduced lung volume, hemoglobin content or cardiac output, accelerates ṠaO2 during stage 1, and finally, total blood O2 capacity (blood volume and hemoglobin content) alone determines ṠaO2 during stage 2. Preterm infants with elevated metabolic rate, respiratory depression, low lung volume, impaired cardiac reserve, anemia, or hypovolemia, are at risk for rapid and profound apneic hypoxemia. Our insights provide a basic physiological framework that may guide clinical interpretation and design of interventions for preventing sudden apneic hypoxemia.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1000588
Pages (from-to)1 - 14
Number of pages14
JournalPLoS Computational Biology
Volume5
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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