A low-cost high-speed CMOS camera for scientific imaging

Daniel J. Duke, Thomas Knast, Bhavraj Thethy, Luis Gisler, Daniel Edgington-Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Non-intrusive temporally and spatially resolved measurements of dynamic phenomena are heavily reliant on high-speed (>1 kHz) digital scientific cameras. The cost of these cameras is a major constraint on the operation of many experimental and educational research facilities. In this paper we present a performance analysis of a low-cost high-speed CMOS camera, the Chronos 1.4. Developed for consumer use, we investigate its potential as a scientific camera. It uses a 12 bit Luxima LUX1310 CMOS sensor with 1280 × 1024 px at 6.6 μm pitch and 1 μs minimum global shutter. It is capable of recording at 1057 Hz at full frame and up to 38 kHz with a reduced field of view. It provides a number of features not typically found in low-cost consumer cameras, such as external triggering and shutter gating control, clock outputs, and raw binary data output. We test the linearity of the sensor response using a pulsed LED source and analyse the sensor performance in terms of noise, jitter and intensity lag. A quantitative demonstration of the camerafs performance under realistic experimental conditions is demonstrated with an image correlation velocimetry measurement in a high-speed propellant spray. The camera compares favourably against several scientific high speed cameras from major manufacturers. The camera is well suited for high resolution forward-scattering and in-line imaging techniques such as schlieren, shadowgraphy, holography and bright-field microscopy. Spatial bias in the dark field noise floor makes it generally unsuitable for lowlight measurement conditions. However, the small footprint and low cost make it ideal as an educational tool and for multi-camera experiments. These tests were conducted independently of the manufacturer and the authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Original languageEnglish
Article number075403
Number of pages11
JournalMeasurement Science and Technology
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Chronos
  • high speed camera
  • high speed photography

Cite this

@article{b48f4d61edb146c8acb032b7c7ed499c,
title = "A low-cost high-speed CMOS camera for scientific imaging",
abstract = "Non-intrusive temporally and spatially resolved measurements of dynamic phenomena are heavily reliant on high-speed (>1 kHz) digital scientific cameras. The cost of these cameras is a major constraint on the operation of many experimental and educational research facilities. In this paper we present a performance analysis of a low-cost high-speed CMOS camera, the Chronos 1.4. Developed for consumer use, we investigate its potential as a scientific camera. It uses a 12 bit Luxima LUX1310 CMOS sensor with 1280 × 1024 px at 6.6 μm pitch and 1 μs minimum global shutter. It is capable of recording at 1057 Hz at full frame and up to 38 kHz with a reduced field of view. It provides a number of features not typically found in low-cost consumer cameras, such as external triggering and shutter gating control, clock outputs, and raw binary data output. We test the linearity of the sensor response using a pulsed LED source and analyse the sensor performance in terms of noise, jitter and intensity lag. A quantitative demonstration of the camerafs performance under realistic experimental conditions is demonstrated with an image correlation velocimetry measurement in a high-speed propellant spray. The camera compares favourably against several scientific high speed cameras from major manufacturers. The camera is well suited for high resolution forward-scattering and in-line imaging techniques such as schlieren, shadowgraphy, holography and bright-field microscopy. Spatial bias in the dark field noise floor makes it generally unsuitable for lowlight measurement conditions. However, the small footprint and low cost make it ideal as an educational tool and for multi-camera experiments. These tests were conducted independently of the manufacturer and the authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.",
keywords = "Chronos, high speed camera, high speed photography",
author = "Duke, {Daniel J.} and Thomas Knast and Bhavraj Thethy and Luis Gisler and Daniel Edgington-Mitchell",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1088/1361-6501/ab1832",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
journal = "Measurement Science and Technology",
issn = "0957-0233",
publisher = "Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd",
number = "7",

}

A low-cost high-speed CMOS camera for scientific imaging. / Duke, Daniel J.; Knast, Thomas; Thethy, Bhavraj; Gisler, Luis; Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel.

In: Measurement Science and Technology, Vol. 30, No. 7, 075403, 07.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A low-cost high-speed CMOS camera for scientific imaging

AU - Duke, Daniel J.

AU - Knast, Thomas

AU - Thethy, Bhavraj

AU - Gisler, Luis

AU - Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel

PY - 2019/6/7

Y1 - 2019/6/7

N2 - Non-intrusive temporally and spatially resolved measurements of dynamic phenomena are heavily reliant on high-speed (>1 kHz) digital scientific cameras. The cost of these cameras is a major constraint on the operation of many experimental and educational research facilities. In this paper we present a performance analysis of a low-cost high-speed CMOS camera, the Chronos 1.4. Developed for consumer use, we investigate its potential as a scientific camera. It uses a 12 bit Luxima LUX1310 CMOS sensor with 1280 × 1024 px at 6.6 μm pitch and 1 μs minimum global shutter. It is capable of recording at 1057 Hz at full frame and up to 38 kHz with a reduced field of view. It provides a number of features not typically found in low-cost consumer cameras, such as external triggering and shutter gating control, clock outputs, and raw binary data output. We test the linearity of the sensor response using a pulsed LED source and analyse the sensor performance in terms of noise, jitter and intensity lag. A quantitative demonstration of the camerafs performance under realistic experimental conditions is demonstrated with an image correlation velocimetry measurement in a high-speed propellant spray. The camera compares favourably against several scientific high speed cameras from major manufacturers. The camera is well suited for high resolution forward-scattering and in-line imaging techniques such as schlieren, shadowgraphy, holography and bright-field microscopy. Spatial bias in the dark field noise floor makes it generally unsuitable for lowlight measurement conditions. However, the small footprint and low cost make it ideal as an educational tool and for multi-camera experiments. These tests were conducted independently of the manufacturer and the authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

AB - Non-intrusive temporally and spatially resolved measurements of dynamic phenomena are heavily reliant on high-speed (>1 kHz) digital scientific cameras. The cost of these cameras is a major constraint on the operation of many experimental and educational research facilities. In this paper we present a performance analysis of a low-cost high-speed CMOS camera, the Chronos 1.4. Developed for consumer use, we investigate its potential as a scientific camera. It uses a 12 bit Luxima LUX1310 CMOS sensor with 1280 × 1024 px at 6.6 μm pitch and 1 μs minimum global shutter. It is capable of recording at 1057 Hz at full frame and up to 38 kHz with a reduced field of view. It provides a number of features not typically found in low-cost consumer cameras, such as external triggering and shutter gating control, clock outputs, and raw binary data output. We test the linearity of the sensor response using a pulsed LED source and analyse the sensor performance in terms of noise, jitter and intensity lag. A quantitative demonstration of the camerafs performance under realistic experimental conditions is demonstrated with an image correlation velocimetry measurement in a high-speed propellant spray. The camera compares favourably against several scientific high speed cameras from major manufacturers. The camera is well suited for high resolution forward-scattering and in-line imaging techniques such as schlieren, shadowgraphy, holography and bright-field microscopy. Spatial bias in the dark field noise floor makes it generally unsuitable for lowlight measurement conditions. However, the small footprint and low cost make it ideal as an educational tool and for multi-camera experiments. These tests were conducted independently of the manufacturer and the authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

KW - Chronos

KW - high speed camera

KW - high speed photography

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068985541&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1088/1361-6501/ab1832

DO - 10.1088/1361-6501/ab1832

M3 - Article

VL - 30

JO - Measurement Science and Technology

JF - Measurement Science and Technology

SN - 0957-0233

IS - 7

M1 - 075403

ER -