A cross-sectional survey using electronic distribution of a questionnaire to subscribers of educational material written by clinicians, for clinicians, to evaluate whether practice change resulted from reading the Clinical Communiqué

Nicola Cunningham, Tony Pham, Briohny Kennedy, Alexander Gillard, Joseph Ibrahim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To explore whether subscribers reported clinical practice changes as a result of reading the Clinical Communiqué (CC). Secondarily, to compare the characteristics of subscribers who self-reported changes to clinical practice with those who did not, and to explore subscribers' perceptions of the educational value of the CC. Design, setting and participants: Online cross-sectional survey between 21 July 2015 and 18 August 2015 by subscribers of the CC (response rate=29.9%, 1008/3373), conducted by a team from Monash University, Australia. Main outcome measures: Change in clinical practice as a result of reading the CC. Results: 53.0% of respondents reported that their practice had changed after reading the CC. Respondents also found that the CC raised awareness (96.5%) and provided ideas about improving patient safety and care (94.1%) leading them to discuss cases with their colleagues (79.6%) and review their practice (75.7%). Multivariate analysis indicated that working in a residential aged care facility (p<0.05) and having taken part in an inquest (p<0.05) were significantly associated with practice change. Conclusion: The design and content of the CC has generated a positive impact on the healthcare community. It is presented in a format that appears to be accessible and acceptable to readers and achieves its goals of promoting safer clinical care through greater awareness of the medico-legal context of practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere014064
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

Keywords

  • coroners
  • death prevention
  • narrative case reports
  • patient safety
  • practice change
  • printed educational material

Cite this

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title = "A cross-sectional survey using electronic distribution of a questionnaire to subscribers of educational material written by clinicians, for clinicians, to evaluate whether practice change resulted from reading the Clinical Communiqu{\'e}",
abstract = "Objective: To explore whether subscribers reported clinical practice changes as a result of reading the Clinical Communiqu{\'e} (CC). Secondarily, to compare the characteristics of subscribers who self-reported changes to clinical practice with those who did not, and to explore subscribers' perceptions of the educational value of the CC. Design, setting and participants: Online cross-sectional survey between 21 July 2015 and 18 August 2015 by subscribers of the CC (response rate=29.9{\%}, 1008/3373), conducted by a team from Monash University, Australia. Main outcome measures: Change in clinical practice as a result of reading the CC. Results: 53.0{\%} of respondents reported that their practice had changed after reading the CC. Respondents also found that the CC raised awareness (96.5{\%}) and provided ideas about improving patient safety and care (94.1{\%}) leading them to discuss cases with their colleagues (79.6{\%}) and review their practice (75.7{\%}). Multivariate analysis indicated that working in a residential aged care facility (p<0.05) and having taken part in an inquest (p<0.05) were significantly associated with practice change. Conclusion: The design and content of the CC has generated a positive impact on the healthcare community. It is presented in a format that appears to be accessible and acceptable to readers and achieves its goals of promoting safer clinical care through greater awareness of the medico-legal context of practice.",
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AB - Objective: To explore whether subscribers reported clinical practice changes as a result of reading the Clinical Communiqué (CC). Secondarily, to compare the characteristics of subscribers who self-reported changes to clinical practice with those who did not, and to explore subscribers' perceptions of the educational value of the CC. Design, setting and participants: Online cross-sectional survey between 21 July 2015 and 18 August 2015 by subscribers of the CC (response rate=29.9%, 1008/3373), conducted by a team from Monash University, Australia. Main outcome measures: Change in clinical practice as a result of reading the CC. Results: 53.0% of respondents reported that their practice had changed after reading the CC. Respondents also found that the CC raised awareness (96.5%) and provided ideas about improving patient safety and care (94.1%) leading them to discuss cases with their colleagues (79.6%) and review their practice (75.7%). Multivariate analysis indicated that working in a residential aged care facility (p<0.05) and having taken part in an inquest (p<0.05) were significantly associated with practice change. Conclusion: The design and content of the CC has generated a positive impact on the healthcare community. It is presented in a format that appears to be accessible and acceptable to readers and achieves its goals of promoting safer clinical care through greater awareness of the medico-legal context of practice.

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