A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Research demonstrates that assessment feedback created using audio, video, and screencast recordings can offer advantages over text-based feedback. However, the majority of research and experience in this domain has largely been limited to a single disciplinary or cohort context. This project aimed to empirically investigate if recorded feedback (i.e. audio, video, and screencast) could be effectively implemented across different contexts, including disciplines. As part of this, teaching staff from five discrete subjects provided digitally recorded feedback to students on at least one assessment task. Assessment types included various forms of written assignments, completed by individuals or groups of students. This paper reports on survey data collected from 351 students who received recorded feedback or text-based feedback. Survey respondents were enrolled in five subjects across four disciplines (Education, Pharmacy, Engineering, and Management). To triangulate the survey findings, interview data from nine students are also included. Overall, the findings indicate that students in all disciplines found digitally recorded feedback to be more satisfying, more useful, and more engaging than text-based feedback alone. However, these outcomes differed across contexts; results tended to be elevated in subjects with smaller cohorts, and when richer audiovisual modalities were used. In two of the cases students’, while still being overall positive, indicated that the feedback was less clear, usable and satisfying than indicated in other cases. These differences are explored and issues of teacher experience, cohort size, group assessment, and disciplinary cognate traditions are considered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMe, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017
Subtitle of host publication34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education
EditorsH. Partridge, K. Davis, J. Thomas
Place of PublicationQueensland Australia
PublisherASCILITE
Pages364-371
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education 2017 - Toowoomba, Australia
Duration: 4 Dec 20176 Dec 2017
Conference number: 34th

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education 2017
Abbreviated titleASCILITE 2017
CountryAustralia
CityToowoomba
Period4/12/176/12/17

Cite this

Phillips, M., Ryan, T., & Henderson, M. (2017). A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education. In H. Partridge, K. Davis, & J. Thomas (Eds.), Me, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education (pp. 364-371). Queensland Australia: ASCILITE.
Phillips, Michael ; Ryan, Tracii ; Henderson, Michael. / A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education. Me, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education. editor / H. Partridge ; K. Davis ; J. Thomas. Queensland Australia : ASCILITE, 2017. pp. 364-371
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title = "A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education",
abstract = "Research demonstrates that assessment feedback created using audio, video, and screencast recordings can offer advantages over text-based feedback. However, the majority of research and experience in this domain has largely been limited to a single disciplinary or cohort context. This project aimed to empirically investigate if recorded feedback (i.e. audio, video, and screencast) could be effectively implemented across different contexts, including disciplines. As part of this, teaching staff from five discrete subjects provided digitally recorded feedback to students on at least one assessment task. Assessment types included various forms of written assignments, completed by individuals or groups of students. This paper reports on survey data collected from 351 students who received recorded feedback or text-based feedback. Survey respondents were enrolled in five subjects across four disciplines (Education, Pharmacy, Engineering, and Management). To triangulate the survey findings, interview data from nine students are also included. Overall, the findings indicate that students in all disciplines found digitally recorded feedback to be more satisfying, more useful, and more engaging than text-based feedback alone. However, these outcomes differed across contexts; results tended to be elevated in subjects with smaller cohorts, and when richer audiovisual modalities were used. In two of the cases students’, while still being overall positive, indicated that the feedback was less clear, usable and satisfying than indicated in other cases. These differences are explored and issues of teacher experience, cohort size, group assessment, and disciplinary cognate traditions are considered.",
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Phillips, M, Ryan, T & Henderson, M 2017, A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education. in H Partridge, K Davis & J Thomas (eds), Me, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education. ASCILITE, Queensland Australia, pp. 364-371, Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education 2017, Toowoomba, Australia, 4/12/17.

A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education. / Phillips, Michael; Ryan, Tracii; Henderson, Michael.

Me, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education. ed. / H. Partridge; K. Davis; J. Thomas. Queensland Australia : ASCILITE, 2017. p. 364-371.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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AB - Research demonstrates that assessment feedback created using audio, video, and screencast recordings can offer advantages over text-based feedback. However, the majority of research and experience in this domain has largely been limited to a single disciplinary or cohort context. This project aimed to empirically investigate if recorded feedback (i.e. audio, video, and screencast) could be effectively implemented across different contexts, including disciplines. As part of this, teaching staff from five discrete subjects provided digitally recorded feedback to students on at least one assessment task. Assessment types included various forms of written assignments, completed by individuals or groups of students. This paper reports on survey data collected from 351 students who received recorded feedback or text-based feedback. Survey respondents were enrolled in five subjects across four disciplines (Education, Pharmacy, Engineering, and Management). To triangulate the survey findings, interview data from nine students are also included. Overall, the findings indicate that students in all disciplines found digitally recorded feedback to be more satisfying, more useful, and more engaging than text-based feedback alone. However, these outcomes differed across contexts; results tended to be elevated in subjects with smaller cohorts, and when richer audiovisual modalities were used. In two of the cases students’, while still being overall positive, indicated that the feedback was less clear, usable and satisfying than indicated in other cases. These differences are explored and issues of teacher experience, cohort size, group assessment, and disciplinary cognate traditions are considered.

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Phillips M, Ryan T, Henderson M. A cross-disciplinary evaluation of digitally recorded feedback in higher education. In Partridge H, Davis K, Thomas J, editors, Me, Us, IT! Proceedings ASCILITE2017: 34th International Conference on Innovation, Practice and Research in the Use of Educational Technologies in Tertiary Education. Queensland Australia: ASCILITE. 2017. p. 364-371