1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE

PD Dao, S Maskevich, R Jumabhoy, SP Drummond, JC Stout

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction:Sleep disturbances are an early symptom of Huntington’s disease (HD), and may be linked to the cognitive, motor and psychiatric symptoms of HD. Long-term collection of HD ambulatory sleep data can show the impact of sleep disturbances as HD symptoms progress. Actigraphy provides an objective measure of sleep well suited to long-term ambulatory data collection, but is cost prohibitive for large-scale studies. Commercial actigraphy devices may be a good alternative. This study aimed to validate research and commercial actigrapy in people with HD.Methods:Seven people with the gene for Huntington’s disease (Age=54.1 ± 6.4, 6F) completed an overnight sleep study using polysomnography, research-grade (Actiwatch Spectrum Pro), and consumer-grade (Fitbit One) actigraphy to measure sleep. For each actigraph, sensitivity and specificity compared to polysomnography were calculated. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses (BAA) were used to compare the actigraphs to polysomnography on total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), sleep latency (SL), and wake after sleep onset (WASO).Results:The sensitivity of the research-grade and consumer-grade actigraphs were 97.13% and 98.90% respectively, and specificities were 31.32% and 27.05% respectively. The only significant ICC was the correspondence between the consumer-grade actigraph and polysomnography for TST (r=0.52, p=.03). Using BAA, both actigraphs overestimated TST (Research-grade - Avg.dif=74.3 ± 54.1min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=94.3 ± 50.2min) and SE (Research-grade - Avg.dif=14.8 ± 11.0%; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=17.5 ± 9.8%), and showed good agreement for SL (Research-grade - Avg.dif=-27.9 ± 28.0min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=-22.0 ± 24.7 min). The research-grade actigraph showed good agreement with polysomnography on WASO (Avg.dif=-20.0 ± 32.2min), whilst the consumer-grade actigraph underestimated WASO (Avg.dif=-39.0 ± 29.1min).Conclusion:In people with HD, neither actigraph showed sufficient agreement with polysomnography to be a suitable replacement for ambulatory sleep measurement, particularly considering the very low specificity values. Our research-grade actigraphy performed notably worse than what is typically seen in patient populations. The development of a HD specific actigraphy algorithm would greatly improve the agreement between actigraphy and polysomnography.Support (If Any):None.
Original languageEnglish
PagesA434-A434
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Apr 2017
EventAnnual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017 - Boston, United States of America
Duration: 3 Jun 20177 Jun 2017
Conference number: 31st

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017
Abbreviated titleSLEEP 2017
CountryUnited States of America
CityBoston
Period3/06/177/06/17

Cite this

Dao, PD., Maskevich, S., Jumabhoy, R., Drummond, SP., & Stout, JC. (2017). 1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE. A434-A434. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, Boston, United States of America. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162
Dao, PD ; Maskevich, S ; Jumabhoy, R ; Drummond, SP ; Stout, JC. / 1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, Boston, United States of America.1 p.
@conference{a95c0ac6ba094cc1909c7b15fae71da9,
title = "1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE",
abstract = "Introduction:Sleep disturbances are an early symptom of Huntington’s disease (HD), and may be linked to the cognitive, motor and psychiatric symptoms of HD. Long-term collection of HD ambulatory sleep data can show the impact of sleep disturbances as HD symptoms progress. Actigraphy provides an objective measure of sleep well suited to long-term ambulatory data collection, but is cost prohibitive for large-scale studies. Commercial actigraphy devices may be a good alternative. This study aimed to validate research and commercial actigrapy in people with HD.Methods:Seven people with the gene for Huntington’s disease (Age=54.1 ± 6.4, 6F) completed an overnight sleep study using polysomnography, research-grade (Actiwatch Spectrum Pro), and consumer-grade (Fitbit One) actigraphy to measure sleep. For each actigraph, sensitivity and specificity compared to polysomnography were calculated. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses (BAA) were used to compare the actigraphs to polysomnography on total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), sleep latency (SL), and wake after sleep onset (WASO).Results:The sensitivity of the research-grade and consumer-grade actigraphs were 97.13{\%} and 98.90{\%} respectively, and specificities were 31.32{\%} and 27.05{\%} respectively. The only significant ICC was the correspondence between the consumer-grade actigraph and polysomnography for TST (r=0.52, p=.03). Using BAA, both actigraphs overestimated TST (Research-grade - Avg.dif=74.3 ± 54.1min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=94.3 ± 50.2min) and SE (Research-grade - Avg.dif=14.8 ± 11.0{\%}; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=17.5 ± 9.8{\%}), and showed good agreement for SL (Research-grade - Avg.dif=-27.9 ± 28.0min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=-22.0 ± 24.7 min). The research-grade actigraph showed good agreement with polysomnography on WASO (Avg.dif=-20.0 ± 32.2min), whilst the consumer-grade actigraph underestimated WASO (Avg.dif=-39.0 ± 29.1min).Conclusion:In people with HD, neither actigraph showed sufficient agreement with polysomnography to be a suitable replacement for ambulatory sleep measurement, particularly considering the very low specificity values. Our research-grade actigraphy performed notably worse than what is typically seen in patient populations. The development of a HD specific actigraphy algorithm would greatly improve the agreement between actigraphy and polysomnography.Support (If Any):None.",
author = "PD Dao and S Maskevich and R Jumabhoy and SP Drummond and JC Stout",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162",
language = "English",
pages = "A434--A434",
note = "Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, SLEEP 2017 ; Conference date: 03-06-2017 Through 07-06-2017",

}

Dao, PD, Maskevich, S, Jumabhoy, R, Drummond, SP & Stout, JC 2017, '1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE' Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, Boston, United States of America, 3/06/17 - 7/06/17, pp. A434-A434. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162

1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE. / Dao, PD; Maskevich, S; Jumabhoy, R; Drummond, SP; Stout, JC.

2017. A434-A434 Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, Boston, United States of America.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractOtherpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - 1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE

AU - Dao, PD

AU - Maskevich, S

AU - Jumabhoy, R

AU - Drummond, SP

AU - Stout, JC

PY - 2017/4/28

Y1 - 2017/4/28

N2 - Introduction:Sleep disturbances are an early symptom of Huntington’s disease (HD), and may be linked to the cognitive, motor and psychiatric symptoms of HD. Long-term collection of HD ambulatory sleep data can show the impact of sleep disturbances as HD symptoms progress. Actigraphy provides an objective measure of sleep well suited to long-term ambulatory data collection, but is cost prohibitive for large-scale studies. Commercial actigraphy devices may be a good alternative. This study aimed to validate research and commercial actigrapy in people with HD.Methods:Seven people with the gene for Huntington’s disease (Age=54.1 ± 6.4, 6F) completed an overnight sleep study using polysomnography, research-grade (Actiwatch Spectrum Pro), and consumer-grade (Fitbit One) actigraphy to measure sleep. For each actigraph, sensitivity and specificity compared to polysomnography were calculated. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses (BAA) were used to compare the actigraphs to polysomnography on total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), sleep latency (SL), and wake after sleep onset (WASO).Results:The sensitivity of the research-grade and consumer-grade actigraphs were 97.13% and 98.90% respectively, and specificities were 31.32% and 27.05% respectively. The only significant ICC was the correspondence between the consumer-grade actigraph and polysomnography for TST (r=0.52, p=.03). Using BAA, both actigraphs overestimated TST (Research-grade - Avg.dif=74.3 ± 54.1min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=94.3 ± 50.2min) and SE (Research-grade - Avg.dif=14.8 ± 11.0%; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=17.5 ± 9.8%), and showed good agreement for SL (Research-grade - Avg.dif=-27.9 ± 28.0min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=-22.0 ± 24.7 min). The research-grade actigraph showed good agreement with polysomnography on WASO (Avg.dif=-20.0 ± 32.2min), whilst the consumer-grade actigraph underestimated WASO (Avg.dif=-39.0 ± 29.1min).Conclusion:In people with HD, neither actigraph showed sufficient agreement with polysomnography to be a suitable replacement for ambulatory sleep measurement, particularly considering the very low specificity values. Our research-grade actigraphy performed notably worse than what is typically seen in patient populations. The development of a HD specific actigraphy algorithm would greatly improve the agreement between actigraphy and polysomnography.Support (If Any):None.

AB - Introduction:Sleep disturbances are an early symptom of Huntington’s disease (HD), and may be linked to the cognitive, motor and psychiatric symptoms of HD. Long-term collection of HD ambulatory sleep data can show the impact of sleep disturbances as HD symptoms progress. Actigraphy provides an objective measure of sleep well suited to long-term ambulatory data collection, but is cost prohibitive for large-scale studies. Commercial actigraphy devices may be a good alternative. This study aimed to validate research and commercial actigrapy in people with HD.Methods:Seven people with the gene for Huntington’s disease (Age=54.1 ± 6.4, 6F) completed an overnight sleep study using polysomnography, research-grade (Actiwatch Spectrum Pro), and consumer-grade (Fitbit One) actigraphy to measure sleep. For each actigraph, sensitivity and specificity compared to polysomnography were calculated. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses (BAA) were used to compare the actigraphs to polysomnography on total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), sleep latency (SL), and wake after sleep onset (WASO).Results:The sensitivity of the research-grade and consumer-grade actigraphs were 97.13% and 98.90% respectively, and specificities were 31.32% and 27.05% respectively. The only significant ICC was the correspondence between the consumer-grade actigraph and polysomnography for TST (r=0.52, p=.03). Using BAA, both actigraphs overestimated TST (Research-grade - Avg.dif=74.3 ± 54.1min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=94.3 ± 50.2min) and SE (Research-grade - Avg.dif=14.8 ± 11.0%; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=17.5 ± 9.8%), and showed good agreement for SL (Research-grade - Avg.dif=-27.9 ± 28.0min; Consumer-grade - Avg.dif=-22.0 ± 24.7 min). The research-grade actigraph showed good agreement with polysomnography on WASO (Avg.dif=-20.0 ± 32.2min), whilst the consumer-grade actigraph underestimated WASO (Avg.dif=-39.0 ± 29.1min).Conclusion:In people with HD, neither actigraph showed sufficient agreement with polysomnography to be a suitable replacement for ambulatory sleep measurement, particularly considering the very low specificity values. Our research-grade actigraphy performed notably worse than what is typically seen in patient populations. The development of a HD specific actigraphy algorithm would greatly improve the agreement between actigraphy and polysomnography.Support (If Any):None.

U2 - 10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162

DO - 10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162

M3 - Abstract

SP - A434-A434

ER -

Dao PD, Maskevich S, Jumabhoy R, Drummond SP, Stout JC. 1163 USING WRIST-WORN ACTIGRAPHIC DEVICES TO MEASURE SLEEP IN PEOPLE WITH HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE. 2017. Abstract from Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies 2017, Boston, United States of America. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleepj/zsx050.1162