Susie Protschky

Dr

20082019
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Personal profile

Biography

I gained my PhD in History from the University of New South Wales in 2007, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Hons I) from the University of Sydney in 2001. I was a Lecturer at the University of Western Australia between 2008 and early 2010. Recently, I was awarded an ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship to carry out research on the involvement of the Orange-Nassau family in Dutch colonial expansion.

I have taught and supervised on diverse aspects of Dutch and British colonialism in Asia and the Indian Ocean world. My research focuses on the Netherlands Indies (colonial Indonesia), ranging across topics such as colonial visual culture; art and environment; food, eating and identity; gender, class and ethnicity; literature and life writing.



My postdoctoral research examines the historic role of the House of Orange-Nassau in Dutch overseas expansion, and is part of a larger ARC-funded project titled 'Gender, power and identity in the early modern Nassau family'.

My project examines how Orange-Nassau self-representations in art, collections, letters and life-writings positioned the family as princely rulers in Europe on a global stage, one that expanded throughout the early modern period but had contracted to just a few colonies by the time the House of Orange was installed as a monarchy in 1813.

The project also traces modern (nineteenth and twentieth century) relations between the House of Orange and its colonial subjects, particularly in the Netherlands Indies, but also in an arena thus far neglected by most scholars - among populations with Dutch ancestry in the Indian Ocean world, where the British had installed themselves as colonial rulers in the early nineteenth century.

I examine how support for (and opposition to) the House of Orange created transnational bonds (and rivalries) in an imperial world; how this manifested itself in the colonial press, in public rituals, and in the private lives of colonial subjects; and how monarchism and anti-monarchism became cornerstones of social and cultural identities in the colonial context.

Projects 2010 2019

Gender, power and identity in the early modern Nassau family

Protschky, S., Broomhall, S., Van Gent, J. & Hohkamp, M.

Australian Research Council (ARC)

4/01/1031/12/13

Project: Research

Research Output 2008 2016

Orangists in a red empire: Salutations from a Dutch queen's supporters in a British South Africa

Protschky, S., 2016, Crowns and Colonies: European Monarchies and Overseas Empires. Aldrich, R. & McCreery, C. (eds.). Manchester UK: Manchester University Press, p. 97-118 22 p. (Studies in Imperialism).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Camera Ethica: Photography, modernity and the governed in late-colonial Indonesia

Protschky, S., 2015, Photography, Modernity and the Governed in Late-Colonial Indonesia. Protschky, S. (ed.). Amsterdam The Netherlands: Amsterdam University Press, p. 11 - 40 30 p.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Ethical projects, ethnographic orders and colonial notions of modernity in Dutch Borneo: G. L. Tichelman's Queen's Birthday photographs from the late 1920s

Protschky, S., 2015, Photography, Modernity and the Governed in Late-Colonial Indonesia. Protschky, S. (ed.). 1 ed. Amsterdam The Netherlands: Amsterdam University Press, p. 71 - 101 31 p.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Photography, Modernity and the Governed in Late-Colonial Indonesia

Protschky, S., 2015, Amsterdam The Netherlands: Amsterdam University Press. 280 p.

Research output: Book/ReportEdited BookOther