Accepting PhD Students

PhD projects

HIV, Sexual Health, Antimicrobial Resistance and Stewardship, Pandemics, Influenza, Coronavirus

1987 …2021

Research activity per year

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Personal profile

Research interests

New publications:

Davis, M. (2022) Selling Immunity: Self, Culture and Economy in Healthcare and Medicine. Routledge.

Davis, M., Schermuly, A., Smith, A., Newman, C. (2022) Diversity via datafication? Digital patient records and citizenship for sexuality and gender diverse people. BioSocieties. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41292-022-00277-5

Schermuly, A.C. and Davis M.D.M. 2022 Guidance for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance with general publics, School of Social Sciences, Monash University, 40 pages. DOI: 10.26180/19679769

Kalam, A., Shano, S., Khan, M., Islam, A., Warren, N., Hassan, M. and Davis, M. (2021) Understanding the Social Drivers of Antibiotic Use During COVID-19 in Bangladesh: Implications for Reduction of Antimicrobial Resistance. PLoS ONE, 16(12): e0261368. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0261368

Biography

Zimbabwe born and educated in Australia and England, Dr Mark Davis (PhD, London) is an internationally-recognised social researcher focussed on the intersection of public health, biomedical technology and health inequities. He leads Microbio\Social Futures, which investigates social responses to pandemics and superbugs. His research on the prevention of antimicrobial resistance is supported by the Australian Research Council (DP170100937, DP200100002, LP170100300). He previously led an ARC Discovery Project (DP110101081) on social responses to the 2009 influenza pandemic in Australia and the United Kingdom and was chief investigator on two HIV treatment and prevention research projects, funded by the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council. Mark also conducted research on digital sexual cultures and HIV prevention and the impact of HIV treatment technologies in the sexual lives of gay men with HIV, funded by the UK’s Medical Research Council. His research has also been supported by the UK’s National Health Service and the Terrence Higgins Trust.

Mark founded the Social Science Network in AMR, which conducts roundtables to promote dialogue on the grand challenges of antimicrobial resistance with social researchers, policy-makers, biomedical scientists, and clinicians. In 2022, Mark is facilitating COVID-19 Narrative Research Seminars with colleagues at Monash and the Association for Narrative Research and Practice, based in London.

Mark’s books include:

Sex, Technology and Public Health (Palgrave)

HIV Treatment and Prevention Technologies in International Perspective (Palgrave), edited with Corinne Squire

Disclosure in Health and Illness (Routledge), edited with Lenore Manderson

Pandemics, Publics and Narrative (Oxford University Press), co-authored with Davina Lohm

Selling Immunity: Self, Culture and Economy in Healthcare and Medicine (Routledge).

Mark is a member of the Australian Psychological Society (elected 1989), the Public Health Association of Australia, the British Sociological Association, the International Sociological Association, and associate member of the Royal Society of Medicine.

 

Supervision interests

Mark supervises doctoral research in the fields of health and society, sexualities, and narrative methods in the social sciences. Topics have included, Facebook friendships, Sorry Day narratives, parenting children with severe emotional distress, cigarette advertising in Indonesia, mid-twentieth century public health film on TB and malaria, self-tracking tech, and refugee mental health support.

Monash teaching commitment

ATS3715 Sexuality & Society: history of sexuality; power and sexuality; performativity; intersectionalities; sexual health and sexualities education.

ATS3717 Health, Culture & Society: health and illness narratives; media and health; digital health; health promotion; transformative health technologies.

Narrative methods in the social sciences.

Expertise related to UN Sustainable Development Goals

In 2015, UN member states agreed to 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. This person’s work contributes towards the following SDG(s):

  • SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-being
  • SDG 16 - Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Research area keywords

  • Immunity as culture
  • Superbugs
  • Pandemics
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Narrative bioethics
  • Social public health
  • HIV treatment and prevention
  • Sociology of antibiotics
  • One Health
  • Coronavirus

Network

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