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Personal profile

Biography

Dr Kidgell's research interests are in the area of neurophysiology of exercise and he specialises in the technique of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) which is a non-invasive method of measuring the functional properties (neuroplasticity) of the human brain, in particular the primary motor cortex. Through the use of this technique, Dr Kidgell has been quantifying the motor cortical responses to strength training. Dr Kidgell is also interested in the neuromodulatory effects of transcranial direct current stimulation prior to, during and following strength training to facilitate the motor cortical responses to training. Dr Kidgell uses sophisticated stimulation and electrophysiological recording and analysis techniques to address these issues, which include TMS, tDCS, spinal cord reflex testing, surface electromyography and single motor unit recordings. The overall goal of his research is to understand how the healthy nervous system functions to control movements following a variety of interventions, and how it may be rehabilitated following neuromuscular injury or disease.

Dr Kidgell has authored 91 peer-reviewed journal papers that have examined the effects of exercise and non-invasive brain stimulation on the human brain. Dr Kidgell has also received in excess of 2.5 million dollars in reasearch funding to support his research. Dr Kidgell has supervised 8 PhD students to completion whose dissertations examined the effects of tDCS on brain excitability and is currently supervising 3 PhD students.

Research interests

Recent publications

Book

  1. Pearce, AJ and Kidgell, DJ. Neuroplasticity following skill and strength training. Nova Science       Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-61728-762-6 (Softcover). (2011).

Book Chapters

  1. Kidgell, DJ. Using Stimulus-Response Curves to Determine Corticospinal Excitability. In:A Closer Look at Motor-Evoked Potential. Eds, Jaberzadeh, S. Nova Science Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-53614-389-8. (2018).
  2. Frazer, AK and Kidgell, DJ. TMS-Induced Motor Evoked Potentials: Definitions and Physiology. In:A Closer Look at Motor-Evoked Potential. Eds, Jaberzadeh, S. Nova Science Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-53614-389-8. (2018).
  3. Pearce, AJ and Kidgell, DJ. Neuroplasticity following skill and strength training: Evidence from transcranial magnetic stimulation studies. In: Horizons in Neuroscience Research. Volume 3 Eds: Andres Costa and Eugenio Villalba. Nova Science Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-61728-027-6. (2011).
  4. Kidgell DJ, Pearce AJ. Motor control adaptations following skill and strength training. In: Fundamentals of Exercise and Sport Science 2e, pp 416-506. McGraw-Hill Publishing. ISBN 13: 9780-0702-8824-9. (2010).

 

Peer-reviewed Papers 

  1. Behtangrad, S, Zoghi, M, Kidgell, DJ, Jaberzadeh, S (2019).  Does cerebellar non-invasive brain stimulation affect corticospial excitability in healthy individuals? A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. Neuroscience Letters, 706; 128-139.
  2. Frazer, AK., Howatson, G., Ahtiainen, JP., Avela, J., Rantalainen, T., Kidgell, DJ (2018). Priming the motor cortex with anodal tDCS affects the acute inhibitory corticospinal responses to strength training. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, accepted October 1st.
  3. Mason, J.Frazer, AK.Pearce, A.Goodwil, AM.Howatson, G.Jaberzadeh, S., and Kidgell, D (2018). Determining the early corticospinal-motoneuronal responses to strength training: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Reviews in the Neurosciences. ISSN 0334-1763 (In Press)
  4. Frazer, A, Pearce, A, Howatson, G, Thomas, K, Goodall, S, Kidgell, DJ (2018). Invited Review:Determining the potential sites of neural adaptation to cross-education: implications for the cross-education of muscle strength. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 118(9): 1751–1772.
  5. Brownstein C, Ansdnell P, Škarabot J, Frazer A, Kidgell D, Howatson G, Goodall S, Thomas K (2018). Motor cortical and corticospinal function differ during an isometric squat compared to isometric knee extension. Experimental Physiology, DOI: 10.1113/EP086982. (Impact Factor, 2.9).
  6. J Talent, S Goodall, DJ Kidgell, R Durbaba, G Howatson (2018). Maximal motor unit response is modulated by contraction intensity, but not contraction type. eNeurologicalSci, doi.org/10.1016/j.ensci.2018.05.002.
  7. Leung, M, Rantalainen, T, Teo, WP and Kidgell, DJ (2018). The ipsilateral corticospinal responses to cross-education ardependent upon the motor-training intervention. Experimental Brain Research, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5224-4.(Impact Factor, 2.2).
  8. Mason, J, Frazer, A, Horvath, D, Pearce, A, Avela, J, Howatson, G, and Kidgell, D (2018). Ipsilateral corticomotor responses are confined to the homologous muscle following cross-education of muscular strength. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 43(1): 11-22. (Impact Factor 2.6)
  9. Leung, M, Rantalainen, t, Teo, W.P, and Kidgell, D (2017). The corticospinal responses of metronome-paced but not self-paced strength training are similar to motor skill training. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 117:2479–2492.(Impact Factor, 2.4)
  10. Kidgell, D, Frazer, A, Bonnano, D, Howatson, G, and Pearce, A (2017).Corticospinal responses following strength training: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Nueroscience, Vol. 46, pp. 2648–2661. (Impact Factor, 2.94).
  11. Mason, J, Frazer, A, Horvath, D, Pearce, A, Avela, J, Howatson, G, and Kidgell, D (2017). Adaptations in corticospinal excitability and inhibition are not spatially confined to the agonist muscle following strength training. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 117:1359–1371. (Impact Factor 2.8).
  12. Frazer, A, Williams, J, Spittle M, and Kidgell DJ (2017). Cross-education of muscular strength is facilitated by homeostatic plasticity​. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 117:665–677. (Impact Factor 2.8).
  13. Kidgell, D, Frazer, A, and Pearce, A (2017). The effect of task complexity influencing bilateral transfer. International Journal of Exercise Science, 10:1174 - 1183. 
  14. A Frazer, D Kidgell, M Spittle, J Williams (2017). Bilateral effects of unilateral anodal tDCS on motor cortex plasticity and the cross-transfer of strength, Clinical Neurophysiology, 128 (3), e149. (Impact Factor 2.9).
  15. E Rio, M van Ark, S Docking, GL Moseley, D Kidgell, JE Gaida, I van den Akker-Scheek, J Zwerver, J Cook (2017). Isometric contractions Are more analgesic than isotonic contractions for patellar tendon pain: an in-season randomized clinical trial. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, 27 (3), 253-259. (Impact Factor 2.2).
  16. Coombs, T, Frazer, A, Horvath, D, Pearce, AJ, Howatson, G, and Kidgell, DJ (2016).Cross-education of wrist extensor strength is not influenced by non-dominant training in right-handers. European Journal of Applied Physiology, DOI:10.1007/s00421-016-3436-5. (Impact Factor 2.4).
  17. E Rio, D Kidgell, GL Moseley, J Cook (2016).  Elevated corticospinal excitability in patellar tendinopathy compared with other anterior knee pain or no pain. Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, 26: 1072-1079. (Impact Factor 3.3).
  18. Hendy, AM, Tillman, A, Rantalainen, T, Muthalib, M, Johnson, L, Kidgell, DJ, Wundersitz, D, Entocott, P, and Teo, WP (2016). Concurrent transcranial direct current stimulation and progressive resistance training in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials (TRLS-D-16-00213). (Impact Factor 2.2).
  19. Frazer, AK, Williams, J, Spittles, M, Rantalainen, T, and Kidgell, DJ (2016). Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex increases cortical voluntary activation and neural plasticity. Muscle & Nerve, DOI:10.1002/mus.25143. (Impact factor 2.8).
  20. Goodwill, AM, Teo, WP, Morgan, P, Daly, RM, and Kidgell, DJ (2016). Dual-tDCS and upper limb rehabilitation improves retention of motor function in chronic stroke: A pilot study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, DOI:10.389/FNHUM.2016.00258. (Impact Factor 3.6).
  21. Kidgell, DJ, Mason, J, Frazer, AK, Pearce, AJ (2016). I-wave periodicity transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTMS) on corticospinal excitability. A systematic review of the literature. Neuroscience, 322 (2016):262-272. (Impact factor 3.5).
  22. E Rio, D Kidgell, GL Moseley, J Gaida, S Docking, C Purdam, J Cook (2015).  Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50: 209-215. (Impact Factor 6.5).
  23. Rio, E, Kidgell D, Purdam C, Gaida J, Moseley GL, Cook J (2016). Isometric contractions are more analgesic than isotonic contractions for patellar tendon pain: an in-season randomised clinical trial . Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine, In Press. (Impact Factor 2.3).
  24. Bradner, C, Warmington, S, Kidgell, DJ (2015). Corticomotor excitability is increased following an acute bout of blood flow restriction resistance exercise. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. doi:160560 (Impact factor 3.6).
  25. Leung, M, Rantalainen, T, Teo, W. P, Kidgell, DJ (2015). Motor cortex excitability is not differentially modulated following skill and strength training. Neuroscience, 305:99-108.(Impact factor 3.5).
  26. Kidgell DJ, Frazer AK, Rantalainen T, Ruotsalainen I, Ahtiainen J, Avela J, Howatson G (2015). Increased cross-education of muscle strength and reduced corticospinal inhibition following eccentric strength training. Neuroscience, doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.05.057 (Impact factor 3.5).
  27. AM Goodwill, W Teo, RM Daly, P Morgan, DJ Kidgell (2015). Effects of bilateral-tdcs combined with upper limb rehabilitation on motor function and cortical plasticity in chronic stroke patients. International Journal of Stroke 10: 49. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  28. AM Hendy, WP Teo, DJ Kidgell (2015). Anodal tDCS prolongs the cross-education of strength and corticospinal plasticity. Brain Stimulation, 8: 362-363. (Impact Factor 6.0).
  29. WP Teo, M Muthalib, DJ Kidgell (2015). Modulation of corticospinal excitability and inhibition of the contralateral M1 during and after ipsilateral anodal tDCS. Brain Stimulation, 8: 341. (Impact Factor 6.0).
  30. D Kidgell (2015). Ipsilateral and contralateral corticospinal response to unilateral strength training are similar for both the dominant and non-dominant limb Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 18: e143 (Impact Factor 3.8).
  31. W Bowen, R Hau, P Li, D Kidgell (2015).  The importance of the contralateral limb in unilateral knee osteoarthritis. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 18: e17. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  32. E Rio, D Kidgell, C Purdam, J Cook (2015). ‘Tendon neuroplastic training’: It's dynamite. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 18: e140 (Impact Factor 3.8).
  33. E Rio, D Kidgell, J Cook (2015). Exercise Reduces Pain Immediately And Affects Cortical Inhibition In Patellar Tendinopathy. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48:A57-A58. (Impact Factor 6.8).
  34. E Rio, D Kidgell, M van Ark, H Zwerver, I Sheek, GL Moseley, J Gaida, Cook J (2015). Tendon neuroplastic training reduces tendon pain and muscle inhibition in-season: Changing the way we think about exercise. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19: e98. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  35. Hendy, Ashlee M and Kidgell, Dawson J (2015). Anodal tDCS Prolongs the Cross-education of Strength and Corticomotor Plasticity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, doi: doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000000600. (Impact factor, 4.5).
  36. A Frazer, T Rantalainen, D Kidgell (2015). Non-invasive brain stimulation increases cortical activation: Implications for rehabilitation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 19: e18. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  37. M Leung, T Rantalainen, W Teo, D Kidgell (2015). Motor skill training and strength training are associated with the same plastic changes in the central nervous system. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 19: e19. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  38. E Rio, D Kidgell, GL Moseley, J Cook (2015). Why is differential diagnosis of anterior knee pain important? Because the brain thinks it is. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 19: e46-e47. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  39. Rio E, Kidgell D, Purdam C, Gaida J, Moseley GL, Pearce AJ, Cook J (2015). Isometric exercise induces analgesia and reduces inhibition in patellar tendinopathy. British Journal of Sports Medicine, doi: 2014-094386. (impact factor, 6.7).
  40. Goodwill, AM, Daly, RM and Kidgell, Dawson J (2015). The effect of anodal tDCS on cross-limb transfer in older adults. Clinical Neurophysiolgy, 2015 Feb 4. pii: S1388-2457(15)00024-3. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2015.01.006. (Impact factor, 3.7).
  41. WP Teo, M Muthalib, D Kidgell, A Frazer, A Hendy, A Goodwill, S Perrey (2015). Ipsilateral M1 transcranial direct current stimulation increases excitability of the contralateral M1 during an active motor task: implications for stroke rehabilitation. Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 58: e1-e2. (Impact Factor 1.8).
  42. Daly RM, Duckham RL, Tait JL, Rantalainen T, Nowson CA, Taaffe DR, Sanders K, Hill KD, Kidgell DJ, Busija L (2015). Effectiveness of dual-task functional power training for preventing falls in older people: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial. Trials. 2015; 16: 120. (Impact factor, 2.2)
  43. RM Daly, J Gianoudis, M Prosser,D Kidgell, KA Ellis (2015). The effects of a protein enriched diet with lean red meat combined with a multi-modal exercise program on muscle and cognitive health and function in older adults: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials. Trials 2015, 16:339 . (Impact factor, 2.2)
  44. Brendan Henderson, Jill Cook, Dawson J. Kidgell, Paul B. Gastin (2015). Game and Training Load Differences in Elite Junior Australian Football. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 14: 494 – 500 (Impact factor 3.1).
  45. Alex Tillman, Makii Muthalib, Ashlee M. Hendy, Liam G. Johnson, Timo Rantalainen, Dawson J. Kidgell, Peter G (2015) . Enticott and Wei-Peng Teo. Lower limb progressive resistance training improves leg strength but not gait speed or balance in Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Aging Neuroscience, March 2015, doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00040 (Impact factor 2.8).
  46. Pirotta, S., Kidgell, D.J and Daly, R.M (2015). Effects of vitamin D supplementation on neuroplasticity in older adults: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomised trial. Osteoporosis International, 26(1):131- 140, (Impact factor 4.2).
  47. Teo, W.P., Muthalib, M., Kidgell, D., Frazer, A., Hendy, A., Goodwill, A.M. & Perrey, S. (2015) Ipsilateral M1 transcranial direct current stimulation increases excitability of the contralateral M1 during an active motor task: Implications for stroke rehabilitation. Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, 58.
  48. Hendy, Ashlee M and Kidgell, Dawson J (2014). Anodal-tDCS applied during unilateral strength training increases strength and corticospinal excitability in the untrained homologous muscle. Experimental Brain Research, DOI: 10.1007/s00221-014-4016-8, (Impact factor 2.3).
  49. Ruotsalainen, Ilona, Ahtiainen, Juha, Kidgell, Dawson, Avela, Janne (2014). Changes in corticospinal excitability during an acute bout of resistance exercise in the elbow flexors. European Journal of Applied Physiology, DOI: 10.1007/s00421-014-2884-z, (Impact factor 2.4).
  50. E Rio, D Kidgell,GL Moseley, J Cook (2014). Patellar Tendinopathy: Looking Outside The Tendon.British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48:A57 (impact factor, 6.7).
  51. E Rio, D Kidgell,J Cook (2014). Exercise Reduces Pain Immediately and Affects Cortical Inhibition in Patellar Tendinopathy. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48:A57-A58 (impact factor, 6.7). 
  52. E Rio, D Kidgell, GL Moseley, J Cook (2015). Patellar Tendinopathy: Looking Outside The Tendon. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48:A57-A57. (Impact Factor 6.8).
  53. EK Rio, J Cook, D Kidgell (2015). Exercise Affects Cortical Inhibition & Reduces Pain In Patellar Tendinopathy: A Randomised Cross Over Trial. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 46:209-210. (Impact Factor 4.5).
  54. Brandner, C, Kidgell, D, and Warmington, S (2014). Unilateral bicep curl hemodynamics: Low-pressure continuous vs high-pressure intermittent blood flow restriction. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, DOI: 10.1111/sms.12297 (Impact factor 3.1).
  55. Scase, E, Kidgell, DJ, Purdam, C, Moseley, L, Jaberzadeh, S, Pearce, AJ, Cook, J. (2013). Cortical changes associated with patellar tendinopathy. Sports Medicine, January 2014, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 9-23 (Impact Factor 5.1).
  56. Kidgell, Dawson J, Daly, Robin M, Young, Kayleigh, Lum, Jarrod, Tooley, Gregory, Jaberzadeh, Shapour, Zoghi, Maryam, Pearce, Alan J (2013). Different current Intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation do not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity. Neural Plasticity, 10.1155/2013/603502, (Impact factor 3.5).
  57. A Goodwill, R Daly, D Kidgell (2013). Motor performance improvements following tDCS and skill practice in older adults: Implications for motor skill training. Clinical Neurophysiology 124: e108-e109 (Impact Factor 2.9).
  58. A Hendy, D Kidgell (2013). Acute strength gain and corticospinal modulation following a single session of a-tDCS combined with strength training of the contralateral homologous muscle. Clinical Neurophysiology 124:e108 (Impact Factor 2.9).
  59. D Kidgell, A Goodwill, A Frazer, R Daly (2013). Unilateral and bilateral tDCS of the human motor cortex does not differentially modulate motor function in healthy adults. Clinical Neurophysiology 124: e107-e108. (Impact Factor 2.9).
  60. R Daly, S Pirotta, D Kidgell (2013). Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Neural Plasticity, Serum Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Functional Performance in Older Adults: A 10-week Double-Blinded, Placebo Controlled Randomised Trial. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 28 (Impact Factor 6.2).
  61. Kidgell, Dawson J, Frazer, Ashlyn K, Goodwill, Alicia M, Daly, Robin M (2013). Induction of cortical plasticity and improved motor performance following unilateral and bilateral transcranial direct current stimulation of the primary motor cortex. Neuroscience 14:64, (Impact Factor 2.3).
  62. Goodwill, Alicia M, Reynolds, John, Daly, Robin M, Kidgell, Dawson J (2013). Formation of cortical plasticity in older adults following tDCS and motor training. Aging Neuroscience, 5: 10.3389/fnagi.2013.00087, (Impact factor 5.2).
  63. Hendy, Ashlee M and Kidgell, Dawson J (2013). Anodal tDCS applied during strength training enhances motor cortical plasticity. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 5(9):1721-9, (Impact factor 4.5).
  64. Timo Rantalainen, Michael Leung, Chris Brandner, Ashleigh Weier, Michael Spittle, Dawson J Kidgell. Short-Interval Intracortical Inhibition Is Not Affected by Varying Task Complexity of an Isometric Task in Biceps Brachii Muscle. (2013). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7: (DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00068) (Impact Factor 3.6).
  65. Kidgell, DJ, Daly, RM, Lum, J, Tooley, Jaberzadeh, S, Zoghi & Pearce, AJ. (2013). Different current intensities of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation does not differentially modulate motor cortex plasticity. Neural Plasticity, doi.org/10.1155/2013/603502 (Impact Factor, 3.5).
  66. Pearce, AJ, Clark, RA & Kidgell, DJ. (2013). A comparison of two methods in acquiring stimulus-response curves with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Brain Stimulation, 6:306-309. (Impact Factor, 4.5).
  67. Leung, M, Spittle, M & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Corticospinal excitability following short-term motor imagery training of a strength task. Journal of Imagery Research in Sport and Physical Activity, 8(1):35-44.
  68. D Kidgell, R Daly, G Tooley, J Lum, A Pearce (2012). Time-course changes in motor cortical excitability following low level constant transcranial direct current stimulation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 15: s119. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  69. A Weier, D Kidgell (2012). Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol on recruitment curve parameters. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 15: s120 (Impact Factor 3.8).
  70. A Hendy, D Kidgell (2012). A novel approach to enhancing muscular strength and function: A pilot study using transcranial direct current stimulation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 15: s119-s120. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  71. D Kidgell, M Leung, C Brandner, M Spittle, A Weier, T Rantalanen (2012). Short-interval intracortical inhibition is not affected by varying the complexity of an isometric task in biceps brachii muscle. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 15: s118-s119. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  72. Jaberzadeh, S, Bastani, A & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Does the longer application of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation increase corticomotor excitability further? A pilot study. Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, 3(4):28-35.
  73. E Scase, J Cook, D Kidgell, S Jaberzadeh, A Pearce (2012). Investigating cortical changes associated with patellar tendinopathy. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 15: s142-s143. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  74. Weier, AT, Pearce, AJ & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Strength training reduces intracortical inhibition. Acta Physiologica, 206(2): 109-119. (Impact Factor, 4.4).
  75. Pearce, AJ, Hendy, AM, Bowen, W & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Corticospinal adaptations and strength maintenance in the immobilised arm following 3-wks unilateral strength training. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sport (DOI: 0.1111/j.1600 0838.2012.01453. (Impact Factor, 3.1).
  76. Goodwill, AM, Pearce, AJ, Kidgell, DJ. (2012) Corticomotor plasticity following cross-education strength training. Muscle and Nerve, 46(3):384-393. (Impact Factor, 2.8).
  77. Hendy, A, Spittle, M, Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Cross education and immobilisation: Mechanisms and implications for injury rehabilitation. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(2):94-101. (Impact Factor, 3.7).
  78. Latella, C, Kidgell, DJ, Pearce, AJ. (2012). Reduction in corticospinal inhibition in the trained and untrained limb following unilateral leg strength training. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 112:3097-3107. (Impact Factor, 2.4).
  79. Goodwill, AM & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). The effects of whole-body vibration on the cross-transfer of strength, Neuroscience (doi: 10.1100/TSWJ/504837). (Impact Factor, 1.7).
  80. Weier, AT & Kidgell, DJ. (2012). Strength training with superimposed whole-body vibration does not preferentially modulate cortical plasticity. Physiology Domains (doi:10.1100/2012/876328). (Impact Factor, 1.7).
  81. Castricum, TJ, Pearce, AJ, Kidgell, DJ. (2012). High Volume versus Low Volume Balance Training on Postural Sway in Adults with Previous Ankle Inversion Injury. International Journal of Motor Learning and Sports Performance, 2(2):29-36.
  82. Kidgell, DJ, Stokes, MA and Pearce AJ. (2011). Strength training of one limb increases corticomotor excitability projecting to the contralateral homologous limb. Motor Control, 15(2):247-66. (Impact Factor, 1.8).
  83. Kidgell, DJ and Pearce, AJ. (2011).What has transcranial magnetic stimulation taught us about neural adaptations to strength training? A brief review. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 25(11): 3208–3217. (Impact Factor, 1.9)
  84. Kidgell, DJ and Pearce, AJ. (2011). Low-frequency vibration of the biceps brachii does not alter the functional properties of the corticospinal pathway. Journal of Motor Learning and Sports Performance, 1(1):9-16.
  85. Pearce, AJ, Latella, C, Kidgell, DJ. (2011). Secondary warm-up following stretching on vertical jumping, change of direction and straight line speed. European Journal of Sport Sciences, (1): 1-10. (Impact Factor, 1.8).
  86. Kidgell, DJ and Pearce, AJ. (2010). Corticospinal properties following short-term strength training of an intrinsic hand muscle, Human Movement Science, 29 (5):631-641. (Impact Factor, 1.6
  87. Pearce, AJ and Kidgell, DJ. Comparison of corticomotor excitability during visuomotor dynamic and static tasks, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13(1):167-171, 2010. (Impact Factor, 3.7).
  88. A Pearce, D Kidgell (2010). Reduction of the bilateral deficit following unilateral strength training: A TMS study. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 13: e88. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  89. D Kidgell, A Pearce (2010). Corticospinal and motor unit adaptations to rapid isometric strength training. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 13: e25-e26. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  90. A Pearce, D Kidgell (2010). Motor cortex excitability responses to a simple visual reaction time task. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 12: e116-e117. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  91. D Kidgell, A Pearce (2010). Neural adaptations following cross-education strength training: A pilot study. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 12: e51. (Impact Factor 3.8).
  92. Pearce, AJ, Kidgell, DJ, Grikepelis, LA and Carlson, JS. (2009). Wearing a sports compression garment on the performance of visuomotor tracking following eccentric exercise: a pilot study, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 12(4):500-502. (Impact Factor, 3.1).
  93. Pearce, AJ and Kidgell, DJ. (2009). Corticomotor excitability during precision motor tasks, Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 12(2): 280-283. (Impact Factor, 3.7).
  94. Pearce, AJ, Kidgell, DJ, J and Carlson, JS. (2009). Effects of secondary warm up following stretching, European Journal of Applied Physiology, 105(2):175-183. (Impact Factor, 2.4).
  95. Netto, K, Carstairs, G, Kidgell, DJ and Aisbett, B. (2010) Neck strength recovery after a single bout of specific strengthening exercise, Physical Therapy in Sport, 11(3):75-80, 2010. (Impact Factor, 1.6).
  96. Kidgell, DJ, Horvath, Jackson, BM and Seymour, PJ. (2007). Effect of six weeks of dura disc and minitrampoline balance training on postural sway in athletes with functional ankle instability. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 21(2):466-469. (Impact Factor, 1.9).
  97. Kidgell, DJ, Sale, MV and Semmler, JG. (2006). Motor unit synchronization measured by cross-correlation is not influenced by short-term strength training of a hand muscle. Experimental Brain Research, 175(4):745-53. (Impact Factor, 2.1).
  98. Hyrsomallis, C, Kidgell, DK. (2001). Effect of heavy-load bench press on upper body power indicators. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, (Impact Factor, 1.9).

 

Supervision interests

Research projects

Does premotor transcranial direct current stimulation increase motor cortex excitability and improve motor function?

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique that modulates the excitability of neurons within the primary motor cortex (M1), but might also induce effects in distant brain areas caused by activity of interconnected brain zones (known as functional connectivity). We have previously established protocols for delivery of tDCS, efficacy of tDCS on brain excitability and motor skill performance in healthy individuals. In these experiments, M1 excitability was tested using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after 20 minutes of anodal-tDCS application over the left M1. Interestingly, brain excitability increased for both the stimulated and non-stimulated M1 suggesting that the two brain regions are interconnected, denoting the phenemona of functional connectivity. Therefore, the aim of this research is to examine whether premotor (PM) tDCS can modify the excitability of the M1 via cortico-cortical connectivity and its effect on motor function. This study will provide a unique insight into the underlying neural mechanisms contributing to any changes in functional connectivity following tDCS.

Is cortico-cortical inhibition reduced following short-term strength training?

It has been documented that increases in muscle strength during the early phases of a strength training program (first 2–4 weeks) occur in the absence of measurable muscle hypertrophy. These early strength gains have therefore been attributed to neural adaptations. Although there is little evidence in humans clearly defining the site of such neural changes, adaptations at the level of the primary motor cortex have been suggested to play a role. However, whether similar cortical adaptations are apparent following strength training remains unclear. Overall, relatively few studies have examined adaptations in cortical excitability and inhibition with strength training and there is not a clear consensus on the site of adaptation or the time-course of adaptation. Some investigations show a training-related increase in cortical excitability, but very few have investigated changes in cortico-cortical inhibition. An understanding of the sites of neural adaptation in response to strength training can lead to refinement of strength training and rehabilitation techniques. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine potential cortico-cortical circuits within the human primary motor cortex following a short-term strength training paradigm.

Does motor training in a mirror box attenuate the loss of motor function following short-term limb immobilization.

Short-term limb immobilization that reduces muscle use for 8–10 hours is known to reduce muscle strength. However, the mechanisms through which this is achieved, and whether these changes can be used to modify motor skill learning, are not known. We have recently shown that unilateral strength training of one limb maintains strength and motor cortical plasticity following short-term immobilization. Interestingly, observation of a motor act performed by oneself, observation of a motor act performed by someone else, and viewing a motor act in a mirror (which is often the case in sport practice) all activate the same neural structures as the actual movement execution, producing subliminal facilitation of neurons forming the motor neural network. The subliminal engagement of neurons might have an adaptive role in motor learning, and therefore action observation seems to be a potential tool to facilitate motor learning during periods of musculoskeletal rehabilitation. A specific form of motor practice that makes use of action observation is mirror training. In mirror training, the practicing limb’s image is superimposed over the resting limb, creating the illusion in the mirror that the resting limb is moving. Mirror training is known to reduce phantom limb pain and enhance recovery of motor function of the paretic lower and upper extremity after a stroke and can also facilitate skill acquisition of the non-trained hand in healthy participants. However, it remains unclear as to whether mirror-training differentially modulates the cross-transfer of strength and motor cortex plasticity following short-term unilateral limb immobilization. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to use a model that combines unilateral limb immobilization and contralateral strength training to determine if strength training of the free limb (with or without a mirror) can attenuate the strength loss acquired during short-term unilateral limb immobilization. These findings have important clinical implications in the management of musculoskeletal or neurological injury that results in limb immobilization.

Investigating the neural adaptations to strength training in older adults.

Advancing age is associated with impaired functional ability, which refers to a reduced ability to perform activities of daily living, such as walking, stair climbing, rising from a chair/bed/toilet, or getting in and out of a car. Reduced ability to perform activities of daily living, increases the risk of falls, a loss of independence, and increased mortality. There is extensive data showing that age-related declines in muscle strength, muscle power, rate of force development, gait, balance and muscular endurance are associated with maladaptive plasticity within the motor cortex, a critical region for movement. In young healthy participants, strength training induces plasticity within the motor cortex and is associated with increased muscle strength. However, to date, there have been no studies that have systematically examined whether older adults, who participate in regular strength training, also experience similar levels of plasticity within the motor cortex as young healthy adults do. Understanding the clinical effects of strength training in older adults is important because the ability to activate muscles and produce force is critical for a number of activities of daily living. For example, there is a good correlation that exists between muscle strength and several clinical outcomes such as, gait speed, decreased risk of falls, and better balance; also, people with greater strength levels tend to live longer. In this regard, understanding the neuroplastic changes that occur in the ageing the corticospinal tract following a strength training intervention is important, as it will advance our understanding of the neural adaptations that accompany the increases in muscle strength.

Research area keywords

  • Neuroplasticity
  • transcranial direct current stimulation
  • transcranial magnetic stimulation
  • strength training
  • bilateral transfer
  • motor learning

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Projects 2019 2019

Research Output 2001 2019

1 Citation (Scopus)

Determining the Corticospinal Responses to Single Bouts of Skill and Strength Training

Mason, J., Frazer, A. K., Jaberzadeh, S., Ahtiainen, J. P., Avela, J., Rantalainen, T., Leung, M. & Kidgell, D. J., 1 Sep 2019, In : Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 33, 9, p. 2299-2307 9 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Determining the early corticospinal-motoneuronal responses to strength training: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Mason, J., Frazer, A. K., Pearce, A. J., Goodwill, A. M., Howatson, G., Jaberzadeh, S. & Kidgell, D. J., Jul 2019, In : Reviews in the Neurosciences. 30, 5, p. 463-476 14 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Does cerebellar non-invasive brain stimulation affect corticospinal excitability in healthy individuals? A systematic review of literature and meta-analysis

Behrangrad, S., Zoghi, M., Kidgell, D. & Jaberzadeh, S., 27 Jul 2019, In : Neuroscience Letters. 706, p. 128-139 12 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Modulation of intracortical inhibition and excitation in agonist and antagonist muscles following acute strength training

Mason, J., Howatson, G., Frazer, A. K., Pearce, A. J., Jaberzadeh, S., Avela, J. & Kidgell, D. J., 5 Aug 2019, (Accepted/In press) In : European Journal of Applied Physiology. 15 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

What are the Acute Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Fractionated Response Time: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Alibazi, R. J., Kidgell, D., Zoghi, M. & Jaberzadeh, S., 5 Sep 2019, (Accepted/In press) In : Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise. 16 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review