We have the evidence for what works in schools, but that doesn’t mean everyone uses it

Press/Media: Article/Feature

Description

Over two-thirds of educators (70%) that we surveyed said they had recently used evidence in their practice. Most consulted with familiar and readily available evidence types such as “student data” (77%) and “policy and curriculum documents” (72%). Respondents used research-based sources much less frequently. Only 43% said they regularly consulted “research disseminated from universities” and 36% engaged with “university-based advice or guidance”. Nearly half (43%) of respondents indicated “teacher observations and experience should be prioritised over research”. These educators were less likely to source research-related evidence types. Our findings suggest research evidence use can play a key role in improving the quality of teaching, both in COVID-19 tutoring programs and classrooms generally. But this can only happen when educators feel they have the appropriate access, support and confidence to make evidence-informed judgments and practices.  

Period19 May 2021

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleWe have the evidence for what works in schools, but that doesn’t mean everyone uses it
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe Conversation
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date19/05/21
    DescriptionOver two-thirds of educators (70%) that we surveyed said they had recently used evidence in their practice. Most consulted with familiar and readily available evidence types such as “student data” (77%) and “policy and curriculum documents” (72%). Respondents used research-based sources much less frequently. Only 43% said they regularly consulted “research disseminated from universities” and 36% engaged with “university-based advice or guidance”. Nearly half (43%) of respondents indicated “teacher observations and experience should be prioritised over research”. These educators were less likely to source research-related evidence types. Our findings suggest research evidence use can play a key role in improving the quality of teaching, both in COVID-19 tutoring programs and classrooms generally. But this can only happen when educators feel they have the appropriate access, support and confidence to make evidence-informed judgments and practices.  
    URLhttps://theconversation.com/we-have-the-evidence-for-what-works-in-schools-but-that-doesnt-mean-everyone-uses-it-160712
    PersonsLucas Walsh, Blake Cutler, Mark Rickinson, Connie Cirkony, Jo Gleeson, Mandy Salisbury

Keywords

  • Research
  • research evidence use
  • teacher education
  • Teachers
  • evidence
  • Q Project
  • QURE