The Victoria India scholarship was recently awarded to three Indian students who wish to pursue their doctoral studies at Victoria-based universities

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The Victoria India Doctoral Scholarships were recently awarded to three Indian students aspiring to pursue their doctoral studies at universities in Victoria. Sneha Sant, Neha Rathi and Shadahul Haque received a stipend of AUD 90,000 for the duration of their doctoral studies and a full-tuition waiver. They are now pursuing their PhDs from universities in the state.

The Winners
Sneha Sant, having completed her MSc in Biotechnology, started working for a National Research Institute where her research focused on HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. Says Sant, “I have a keen interest in finding solutions to India’s problems, so when I was offered a chance to be a part of influenza research, I grabbed the opportunity, especially since I would get a chance to work with scientists of international repute.”

She is currently pursuing her research on creating a universal T-cell based vaccine that can combat multiple, evolving strains of the influenza virus at the University of Melbourne.

Sadab Haque completed his Masters in Pharmacy, while specialising in pharmaceutics, on an AICTE GATE scholarship, awarded by the Ministry of HRD. After having worked on developing brain targeted intranasal nano-particulate drug delivery systems, for use in the treatment of depression, he started working for an Indian pharmaceutical company.

“I have always been motivated and interested in undertaking patient centric research in nano medicine and nano pharmaceuticals,” says Haque, who is now pursuing his doctorate at Monash University, Melbourne. “I firmly believe that nano medicine can provide better therapeutic options for life threatening diseases and help improve patient care. It is also my aim to continue working as an independent researcher in the field of nano pharmaceuticals,” he adds.

Haque’s research focuses on developing a drug delivery platform for administering therapeutic agents through the pulmonary route – to be used in treating airway ailments, particularly most types of lung cancers.

Neha Rathi completed her Masters degree in food and nutrition from a Mumbai-based college and worked as a nutritionist at the Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre (NRC) at Phansidewa Block Primary Health Centre, in West Bengal, where she was exposed to issues of malnutrition in rural India and its widespread consequences among children residing there.

“The experience of working with acutely malnourished and highly underweight children in rural India was an eye-opener for me as a nutritionist. This lack of awareness of nutrition among citizens residing in rural India, coupled with a dearth of information with regard to the promotion of healthy eating among children inspired me pursue my research in this area,” she says.

Rathi is now pursuing her doctoral studies from the Deakin University, Melbourne. Her research focuses on developing healthy eating habits among Indian children in the age group of 13-18, belonging to the lower socio-economic strata.

Now in its third year, the scholarship is funded by the Victorian Department of State Development, Business and Innovation, and is managed by the Australia India Institute. The scholarship has previously been awarded to 23 Indians and aims to provide Indian doctoral students an opportunity to work with Victorian researchers and supervisors in research facilities across the globe.

 

Period31 Mar 2014

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Media coverage

  • TitleThe Victoria India scholarship was recently awarded to three Indian students who wish to pursue their doctoral studies at Victoria-based universities
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletTimesgroup.com
    Media typeWeb
    CountryIndia
    Date31/03/14
    DescriptionThe Victoria India Doctoral Scholarships were recently awarded to three Indian students aspiring to pursue their doctoral studies at universities in Victoria. Sneha Sant, Neha Rathi and Shadahul Haque received a stipend of AUD 90,000 for the duration of their doctoral studies and a full-tuition waiver. They are now pursuing their PhDs from universities in the state.

    The Winners
    Sneha Sant, having completed her MSc in Biotechnology, started working for a National Research Institute where her research focused on HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. Says Sant, “I have a keen interest in finding solutions to India’s problems, so when I was offered a chance to be a part of influenza research, I grabbed the opportunity, especially since I would get a chance to work with scientists of international repute.”

    She is currently pursuing her research on creating a universal T-cell based vaccine that can combat multiple, evolving strains of the influenza virus at the University of Melbourne.

    Sadab Haque completed his Masters in Pharmacy, while specialising in pharmaceutics, on an AICTE GATE scholarship, awarded by the Ministry of HRD. After having worked on developing brain targeted intranasal nano-particulate drug delivery systems, for use in the treatment of depression, he started working for an Indian pharmaceutical company.

    “I have always been motivated and interested in undertaking patient centric research in nano medicine and nano pharmaceuticals,” says Haque, who is now pursuing his doctorate at Monash University, Melbourne. “I firmly believe that nano medicine can provide better therapeutic options for life threatening diseases and help improve patient care. It is also my aim to continue working as an independent researcher in the field of nano pharmaceuticals,” he adds.

    Haque’s research focuses on developing a drug delivery platform for administering therapeutic agents through the pulmonary route – to be used in treating airway ailments, particularly most types of lung cancers.

    Neha Rathi completed her Masters degree in food and nutrition from a Mumbai-based college and worked as a nutritionist at the Nutrition Rehabilitation Centre (NRC) at Phansidewa Block Primary Health Centre, in West Bengal, where she was exposed to issues of malnutrition in rural India and its widespread consequences among children residing there.

    “The experience of working with acutely malnourished and highly underweight children in rural India was an eye-opener for me as a nutritionist. This lack of awareness of nutrition among citizens residing in rural India, coupled with a dearth of information with regard to the promotion of healthy eating among children inspired me pursue my research in this area,” she says.

    Rathi is now pursuing her doctoral studies from the Deakin University, Melbourne. Her research focuses on developing healthy eating habits among Indian children in the age group of 13-18, belonging to the lower socio-economic strata.

    Now in its third year, the scholarship is funded by the Victorian Department of State Development, Business and Innovation, and is managed by the Australia India Institute. The scholarship has previously been awarded to 23 Indians and aims to provide Indian doctoral students an opportunity to work with Victorian researchers and supervisors in research facilities across the globe.

    Producer/AuthorAditya Harikrishnan
    URLhttps://www.educationtimes.com/article/65781340/69518885/Oz-calling.html
    PersonsShadab Haque