Multilineage potential and self-renewal define an epithelial progenitor cell population in the adult thymus.

Press/Media: Article/Feature

Description

Published in Cell Reports Agu 21, 2014: 8(4):1198-1209.  https://doi.or/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.07.029

 Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are critical for T cell development and self-tolerance but are gradually lost with age. The existence of thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPCs) in the postnatal thymus has been inferred, but their identity has remained enigmatic. Here, we assessed the entire adult TEC compartment in order to reveal progenitor capacity is retained exclusively within a subset of immature thymic epithelium displaying several hallmark features of stem/progenitor function. These adult TEPCs generate mature cortical and medullary lineages in a stepwise fashion, including Aire+ TEC, within fetal thymus reaggregate grafts. Although relatively quiescent in vivo, adult TEPCs demonstrate significant in vitro colony formation and self-renewal. Importantly, 3D-cultured TEPCs retain their capacity to differentiate into cortical and medullary TEC lineages when returned to an in vivo thymic microenvironment. No other postnatal TEC subset exhibits this combination of properties. The characterization of adult TEPC will enable progress in understanding TEC biology in aging and regeneration.

Period18 Aug 2014 → 26 Sep 2014

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleF1000Prime Recommended
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletFaculty of 1000Prime
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Sizeone page
    CountryAustralia
    Date26/09/14
    DescriptionRecommended in F1000Prim as being of special significance in its field by F1000 Faculty Member Valerie Horsley.

    Faculty of 1000 Ltd | Science Navigation Group, Registered in England and Wales with Company Number 3739756, Middlesex House | 34-42 Cleveland Street | London W1T 4LB | United Kingdom
    Producer/AuthorValery Horsley, UK.
    URLf1000.com/prime/718535298?subscriptioncode=9a32a636-6975-4e36-a213-19c79acd4b4c
    PersonsAnn Chidgey

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleCrucial stem cell discovery
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletHerald Sun
    Media typePrint
    Duration/Length/SizeArticle
    CountryAustralia
    Date18/08/14
    DescriptionMelbourne stem cell scientists have made a breakthrough discovery expected to improve the health of chemotherapy and HIV patients.
    The Monash University stem cell researchers have found the "Holy Grail" of their field: a cell that can reinvigorate the thymus, which is the key organ in our immune system.
    The discovery is likely to lead to improved health for patients with compromised immune systems such as those undergoing chemotherapy or with HIV, as well as the elderly.
    The thymus sits just above the heart and is where infection-fighting T-cells are made.
    Associate Professor Ann Chidgey, from the Monash School of Biomedical Sciences and her team isolated thymic epithelial stem cells which build the structural and functional framework of the thymus.
    Prof Chidgey told the Herald Sun that without thymic epithelial cells, we would have no T-cells.
    The new research is published in the latest issue of the scientific journal, Cell Reports.
    Producer/AuthorKathryn Powley
    PersonsAnn Chidgey

Keywords

  • thymus
  • immune ageing
  • thymus regeneration
  • stem cells