Monash researchers lead a collaboration that reported the adaptations of TIA pathways in response to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

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Congratulations to Monash Health and Monash University researchers, Dr Andy LimProf Henry MaProf Thanh PhanDr Shaloo Singhal and Dr Ben Clissold  for leading an international collaboration that reported the adaptations of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) pathways in response to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

A TIA is a 'mini-stroke' where symptoms eventually resolve, avoiding permanent disability or death. It is however a warning sign for a possible future stroke. With rapid access pathways, the risk of having a stroke can be decreased from 1 in 10 to 1 in 50. Monash Health is one of the few world leaders that have published such a strategy.

Monash Health and Monash University  researchers teamed up with seventeen of the biggest names in the field to agree upon the details of the Federally supported international report. Monash Health, Monash University, Investigators from seven countries and three continents were part of the consortium.

The main finding is that stroke care systems around the world have modified assessment strategies and imaging techniques, but have all managed to remain operational.  

Global stroke care systems have adapted to the sudden challenge of the pandemic like an immune system defending against an intruder. Instead of shying away, services around the world have strengthened, fortified, and continued to be operational.

Transient ischaemic attack suffererss continue to need expert assessment and management even during a pandemic. Services around the world have not given up, but instead adapted to the challenge.

"This report shares the experiences of our international consortium, further aiding the fight against stroke during tough times. This will aid in the journey towards a safer and more effective system of care", said Dr Lim".

The results are being published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases (Free open access until 7th October 2020).

 

Period2 Sep 2020

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Media coverage

  • TitleMonash researchers lead a collaboration that reported the adaptations of TIA pathways in response to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletMonash School of Clinical Sciences
    Media typeWeb
    Country/TerritoryAustralia
    Date2/09/20
    DescriptionCongratulations to Monash Health and Monash University researchers, Dr Andy Lim, Prof Henry Ma, Prof Thanh Phan, Dr Shaloo Singhal and Dr Ben Clissold for leading an international collaboration that reported the adaptations of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) pathways in response to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

    A TIA is a 'mini-stroke' where symptoms eventually resolve, avoiding permanent disability or death. It is however a warning sign for a possible future stroke. With rapid access pathways, the risk of having a stroke can be decreased from 1 in 10 to 1 in 50. Monash Health is one of the few world leaders that have published such a strategy.

    Monash Health and Monash University researchers teamed up with seventeen of the biggest names in the field to agree upon the details of the Federally supported international report. Monash Health, Monash University, Investigators from seven countries and three continents were part of the consortium.

    The main finding is that stroke care systems around the world have modified assessment strategies and imaging techniques, but have all managed to remain operational.

    Global stroke care systems have adapted to the sudden challenge of the pandemic like an immune system defending against an intruder. Instead of shying away, services around the world have strengthened, fortified, and continued to be operational.

    Transient ischaemic attack suffererss continue to need expert assessment and management even during a pandemic. Services around the world have not given up, but instead adapted to the challenge.

    "This report shares the experiences of our international consortium, further aiding the fight against stroke during tough times. This will aid in the journey towards a safer and more effective system of care", said Dr Lim".

    The results are being published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases (Free open access until 7th October 2020).
    Producer/AuthorMonash School of Clinical Sciences
    URLscsenews.blogspot.com/2020/09/monash-researchers-lead-collaboration.html#more
    PersonsAndy Lim

Keywords

  • Stroke
  • Transient Ischaemic Attack
  • Process Innovation
  • Health Systems
  • COVID-19