Efficacy of drug-driving test programs

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Period12 Sep 2019 → 11 Oct 2019

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleFurther reference to comments on roadside drug testing
    Degree of recognitionRegional
    Media name/outlet5AAm and 5AU (Port Augusta)5CS (Port Pirie)5RM (Berri)
    Duration/Length/Size1 min, 4 sec.
    CountryAustralia
    Date11/10/19
    DescriptionLeon Byner says according to Monash University Accident Research Centre Professor Michael Fitzharris, the methods of roadside testing is doing its job. There's also a high degree of confidence in detecting recent use and impairment of the skills needed for driving.
    PersonsMichael Fitzharris

Media contributions

3

Media contributions

  • TitleInterview (comment) on roadside drug-testing programs following research paper published in Drug Testing and Analysis by USyd researchers
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletABC News (ABC News (Sydney)ABC News (Brisbane)ABC News (Adelaide)ABC News (Perth)ABC News (Canberra)ABC News (Newcastle)ABC News (Gold Coast))
    Duration/Length/Size7mins 49secs
    CountryAustralia
    Date12/09/19
    DescriptionSummary:
    Interview with Monash University's Accident Research Centre Associate Professor Michael Fitzharris. Tchilinguirian says a study of road-side drug testing devices widely used by police in Australia conducted by a PhD student at the University of Sydney has found that their accuracy and sensitivity are below the standards recommended by European Union authorities. She states the study found the devices frequently failed to detect high concentrations of THC. Fitzharris notes it has been known that the fluids test have such limitations. He says the test is just the first port of call for police who pulls over a driver. He states officers can still perform the driver impairment assessment even if the test returns a negative. He recalls Victoria introduced the test in 2004. He notes he was at the International Drug and Alcohol Conference in Canada. He says Canada moved to oral fluid testing. Mentions Ireland.
    Producer/AuthorABC News
    PersonsMichael Fitzharris
  • TitleRoadside drug tests for cannabis return false results, research finds
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletABC News Online
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date12/09/19
    DescriptionComment on methods used to detect drug-drivers. A study of roadside drug testing devices widely used by police in Australia has called into question their reliability for detecting cannabis, ABC News reports. Associate Professor Michael Fitzharris from Monash's Accident Research Centre says: "It should be seen as an effective program to manage the drug-driving problem in Australia, and it's now being used as a template by other jurisidctions around the world."
    Producer/AuthorBen Knight
    URLhttps://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-09-12/police-roadside-cannabis-drug-testing-devices-questioned/11502436
    PersonsMichael Fitzharris
  • TitleAustralia has led the world in roadside drug-testing since it was first introduced in 2004
    Media name/outletABC News (Karina Carvalho at ABC News, Sydney, ABC News Hour), also: Also broadcast from the following 9 stations: ABC News (Melbourne), ABC News (Regional NSW), ABC News (Brisbane), ABC News (Adelaide), ABC News (Perth), ABC News (Regional Queensland), ABC News (Hobart), ABC News (Canberra), ABC News (Regional Victoria)
    Duration/Length/Size2mins 07secs
    CountryAustralia
    Date12/09/19
    DescriptionExpert comment: Summary: Australia has led the world in roadside drug-testing since it was first introduced in Victoria 15 years ago. New study by University of Sydney researchers suggests the technology could be flawed as researchers have found that saliva testing devices used to detect cannabis in drivers fall below international standards. The study also learned the devices sometimes returned false positives triggered by amounts of THC. Having any THC in the system while driving is a criminal offence in all states. A number of charges have been dismissed in NSW courts. Neither NSW nor Victorian Police were willing to comment on the findings. In 2020, NSW is aiming for 200,000 roadside tests, and Vic wants to double that in 2021.
    Producer/AuthorKarina Carvalho
    PersonsMichael Fitzharris

Keywords

  • drug-driving
  • cannabis
  • Road safety