Breaking down resistance

Press/Media: Research

Description

n this case, however, it was Mr Selkrig's work in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at Monash that first identified a new molecular mechanism that could lead to drugs that "disarm" disease-causing micro-organisms and counter the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The four-year project resulting from Mr Selkrig's initial research ultimately involved all 22 scientists variously based at the universities of Monash, Melbourne and Queensland, as well as Glasgow University in Scotland and Birmingham University in England.

But it was at Monash that Mr Selkrig, under the supervision of Professor Trevor Lithgow, discovered a protein complex that acts as a kind of molecular pump in bacteria. Dubbed the "Translocation and Assembly Module" or TAM, the proteins he found allowed bacteria to shuttle key disease-causing molecules from inside cells where they are made to the outside surface, priming the bacteria for infection.

Period4 Apr 2012 → 22 May 2012

Media coverage

2

Media coverage

  • TitleTo beat resistant bacteria, let them live
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletFuturity
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date30/04/12
    URLhttps://www.futurity.org/to-beat-resistant-bacteria-let-them-live/
    PersonsJoel Pearson Selkrig
  • TitleDisarming disease-causing bacteria
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletPhys org
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date4/04/12
    Description
    Published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, research led by Monash University showed a protein complex called the Translocation and Assembly Module (TAM), formed a type of molecular pump in bacteria. The TAM allows bacteria to shuttle key disease-causing molecules from inside the bacterial cell where they are made, to the outside surface, priming the bacteria for infection.

    Lead author and PhD student Joel Selkrig of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Monash said the work paves the way for future studies to design new drugs that inhibit this process.



    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2012-04-disease-causing-bacteria.html#jCp
    URLhttps://phys.org/news/2012-04-disease-causing-bacteria.html
    PersonsJoel Pearson Selkrig

Media contributions

3

Media contributions

  • TitleBreaking down resistance
    Degree of recognitionNational
    Media name/outletThe Sydney Morning Herald
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date22/05/12
    Descriptionn this case, however, it was Mr Selkrig's work in the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at Monash that first identified a new molecular mechanism that could lead to drugs that "disarm" disease-causing micro-organisms and counter the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    The four-year project resulting from Mr Selkrig's initial research ultimately involved all 22 scientists variously based at the universities of Monash, Melbourne and Queensland, as well as Glasgow University in Scotland and Birmingham University in England.

    But it was at Monash that Mr Selkrig, under the supervision of Professor Trevor Lithgow, discovered a protein complex that acts as a kind of molecular pump in bacteria. Dubbed the "Translocation and Assembly Module" or TAM, the proteins he found allowed bacteria to shuttle key disease-causing molecules from inside cells where they are made to the outside surface, priming the bacteria for infection.
    URLhttps://www.smh.com.au/education/breaking-down-resistance-20120521-1z0yy.html
    PersonsTrevor Lithgow, Joel Pearson Selkrig
  • TitleTAM protein complex - a potential antibacterial target
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletNews medical life sciences
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date6/04/12
    DescriptionScientists could produce new antibacterial treatments by disarming the molecular pumps bacteria use to bring disease causing molecules in contact with animals and humans.

    Research published today in Nature Structure and Molecular Biology showed a protein complex called the Translocation and Assembly Module (TAM), forms a type of molecular pump, allowing bacteria to shuttle key disease causing molecules from inside the bacterial cell where they are made, to the outside surface, priming the bacteria to infect other organisms.
    URLhttps://www.news-medical.net/news/20120406/TAM-protein-complex-a-potential-antibacterial-target.aspx
    PersonsJoel Pearson Selkrig
  • TitleDisarming disease-causing bacteria
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletIndia Medical times
    Media typeWeb
    CountryAustralia
    Date5/04/12
    URLwww.indiamedicaltimes.com/tag/joel-selkrig/
    PersonsJoel Pearson Selkrig